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As far as I can tell, there are two ways of copying a bitmap.

Bitmap.Clone()

Bitmap A = new Bitmap("somefile.png");
Bitmap B = (Bitmap)A.Clone();

new Bitmap()

Bitmap A = new Bitmap("somefile.png");
Bitmap B = new Bitmap(A);

How do these approaches differ? I'm particularly interested in the difference in terms of memory and threading.

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I had a case where the file I was reading was a 1 bit per pixel TIFF file. new Bitmap(A) returned a 32 bit per pixel bitmap, while (Bitmap)A.Clone() was still 1 bit per pixel. Since I was embedding the image in a PDF for later emailing, keeping the image at 1 bit was important. @Aelios @HansPassant –  gmlobdell Jan 10 '13 at 23:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

It is the common difference between a "deep" and a "shallow" copy, also an issue with the almost-deprecated IClonable interface. The Clone() method creates a new Bitmap object but the pixel data is shared with the original bitmap object. The Bitmap(Image) constructor also creates a new Bitmap object but one that has its own copy of the pixel data.

Using Clone() is very rarely useful. Lots of questions about it at SO where the programmer hopes that Clone() avoids the typical trouble with bitmaps, the lock on the file from which it was loaded. It doesn't. Only use Clone() when you pass a reference to code that disposes the bitmap and you don't want to lose the object.

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Agreed. We used Clone() in the case where we need to use have the same Bitmap used (unmodified) in many places, but we wanted to cut down on the amount of memory used by the copies. One thing I don't know is if you modify one of the clones (i.e. SetPixel), if that causes all shared pixel data to be modify, or if it causes the modified one to allocate its own pixel data (thus just modifying its own). –  Matt Smith Oct 3 '12 at 14:10
    
@MattSmith, the data will be copied after the lock command, even with ReandOnly flag. –  Pedro77 Mar 25 at 13:40

Reading the previous answers, I got worried that the pixel data would be shared between cloned instances of Bitmap. So I performed some tests to find out the differences between Bitmap.Clone() and new Bitmap().

Bitmap.Clone() keeps the original file locked. Using new Bitmap(original) instead will unlock the file after original.Dispose().

  Bitmap original = new Bitmap("Test.jpg");
  Bitmap clone = (Bitmap) original.Clone();
  original.Dispose();
  File.Delete("Test.jpg"); // Will throw System.IO.IOException

Using the Graphics class to modify the clone, will not modify the original.

  Bitmap original = new Bitmap("Test.jpg");
  Bitmap clone = (Bitmap) original.Clone();
  Graphics gfx = Graphics.FromImage(clone);
  gfx.Clear(Brushes.Magenta);
  Color c = original.GetPixel(0, 0); // Will not equal Magenta unless present in the original

Using the LockBits method yields different memory blocks for the original and clone.

  Bitmap original = new Bitmap("Test.jpg");
  Bitmap clone = (Bitmap) original.Clone();
  BitmapData odata = original.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, original.Width, original.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadWrite, original.PixelFormat);
  BitmapData cdata = clone.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, clone.Width, clone.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadWrite, clone.PixelFormat);
  Assert.AreNotEqual(odata.Scan0, cdata.Scan0);

The results are the same with both object ICloneable.Clone() and Bitmap Bitmap.Clone(Rectangle, PixelFormat).

Next, I tried some simple benchmarks using the following code.

  Bitmap original = new Bitmap("Test.jpg");
  long mem1 = Process.GetCurrentProcess().PrivateMemorySize64;
  Stopwatch timer = Stopwatch.StartNew();

  List<Bitmap> list = new List<Bitmap>();
  Random rnd = new Random();
  for(int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
  {
    list.Add(new Bitmap(original));
  }

  long mem2 = Process.GetCurrentProcess().PrivateMemorySize64;
  Debug.WriteLine("ElapsedMilliseconds: " + timer.ElapsedMilliseconds);
  Debug.WriteLine("PrivateMemorySize64: " + (mem2 - mem1));

Storing 50 copies in the list took 6.2 seconds and resulted in 1.7 GB memory usage (the original image is 24 bpp and 3456 x 2400 pixels = 25 MB).

  for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
  {
    list.Add((Bitmap) original.Clone());
  }

Using Clone() instead I could store 1 000 000 copies in the list during 0.7 seconds and using 0.9 GB. As expected, Clone() is very light-weight in comparison to new Bitmap().

  Random rnd = new Random();
  for(int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
  {
    Bitmap clone = (Bitmap) original.Clone();
    clone.SetPixel(rnd.Next(clone.Width), rnd.Next(clone.Height), Color.FromArgb(rnd.Next(0x1000000)));
    list.Add(clone);
  }

This test made a copy using Clone() and then changed one random pixel to a random color. This operation seem to trigger a copy of all pixel data from the original, because we're now back at 7.8 seconds and 1.6 GB.

  for(int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
  {
    Bitmap clone = (Bitmap) original.Clone();
    Graphics.FromImage(clone).Dispose();
    list.Add(clone);
  }

Just creating a Graphics object from the image will not trigger the copy, you have to draw something using the Graphics object.

  for(int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
  {
    Bitmap clone = (Bitmap) original.Clone();
    BitmapData data = clone.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, clone.Width, clone.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, clone.PixelFormat);
    clone.UnlockBits(data);
    list.Add(clone);
  }

Using LockBits on the other hand, will copy the data even if ImageLockMode.ReadOnly is specified.

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Very nice post man! –  Pedro77 May 3 '13 at 17:57

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