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Suppose I have the following table structure:

Field1 Field2 Field3
val1   valb_1 date
val1   valb_2 date
val1   valb_3 date
val2   valb_4 date
val3   valb_5 date

How would I limit for a maximum of 5 different values in Field1 in which the fields might be filled with the exact same value as the example suggest with "val1" , and a maximum of 200 values in Field2 in which the fields have always a different value. ordering by date desc.

Also how to make it as equivalent as possible for the limit of 5 for Field1, example for the 200 limit : 50 belong to val1, 100 to val2, and 100 to val3 of field1, that is 250, there were 100 in val 2 and 100 in val 3, ideally the 200 limit would be a selection of 50 in val1 and 75 in each of val 2 and 3.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not exactly sure what you want to achieve, but think about it this way:

Could it be solved with 3 different queries, and the results put together with a UNION ?

Or are these limits that you talk about related, so that if for the 5 values for field 1, they appear with the 200 different values in Field2.

CREATE VIEW F1LIMIT5  as SELECT DISTINCT Field1 from MYTABLE limit 5;
CREATE VIEW F2LIMIT200 as SELECT DISTINCT Field2 from MYTABLE limit 200;
SELECT * from MYTABLE where Field1 in (SELECT * FROM F1LIMIT5) and Field2 in (SELECT * FROM F2LIMIT200) order by Field3 desc ;

But this may give you more than 200 records. You could add a LIMIT 200 at the end to do that, but I'm not even sure if it's what you want. The technique is to break things down into small steps, and then build on that. I find using views is better than complex queries, because you can test each part along the way to make sure you are getting what you want

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It would give me 200 records as values in field2 are all unique :) Thank you Mikkel –  Gage Thomson Oct 5 '12 at 14:50

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