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I have some scenario like this:

public class BaseClass {
    protected void protectedMethod(OtherObject object) {
    ...
    }
} 

public class Child1 extends BaseClass {
    @Override
    protected void protectedMethod(OtherObject object) {
        super.protectedMethod(object);
        // Custom Child1 logic
        ...
    }
}

public class Child2 extends BaseClass {
    @Override
    protected void protectedMethod(OtherObject object) {
        super.protectedMethod(object);
        // Custom Child2 logic
        ...
    }
}

Then when i call the "protectedMethod" iterating through an array of "BaseClass" object, compiler gives me protected access error:

OtherObject other = new OtherObject();

BaseClass[] objects = {
    new Child1(),
    new Child2()
}

for (BaseClass object : objects) {
    object.protectedMethod(other); //this line gives me protected access error
}

But if i do the same in a different not polymorphism manner, it works fine.

OtherObject other = new OtherObject();

Child1 child1 = new Child1();
Child2 child2 = new Child2();

child1.protectedAccess(other);
child2.protectedAccess(other);

I don't get to tell what is the difference between the two ways.

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Are the two child classes in the same package as the test program by any chance? –  Tudor Oct 3 '12 at 13:55
    
Where are you invoking the method from?? –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '12 at 13:56
    
The difference is, in the second one you execute different methods (from classes Child1 and Child2) but in the first one you execute BaseClass's method twice.... Maybe you want to make BaseClass (or the protectedMethod) abstract? –  Shark Oct 3 '12 at 13:56
    
You're calling a different method in every scenario. Sometimes you're calling protectedMethod(), other times protectedMethod(other), and even protectedAccess(other). Do you mean for these to all be the same? –  Vulcan Oct 3 '12 at 13:58
    
@Tudor yes they actually are –  jmoreira Oct 3 '12 at 13:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In Java, the ''protected'' access qualifier allows access not only by subclasses, but by other classes in the same package.

If your last code snippet is in the same package as Child1 and Child2, then it would have access to the protected methods in Child1 and Child2.

EDIT:

You can fix this problem and keep your polymorphism by introducing your own base class, in your own package.

 public MyBaseClass extends BaseClass { 
    @Override
    protected void protectedMethod(OtherObject object) {
        super.protectedMethod(object);
    }
 }

 public Child1 extends MyBaseClass { ... }
 public Child2 extends MyBaseClass { ... }

And then work with a collection of your own base class type.

 NyBaseClass[] objects = {
    new Child1(),
    new Child2()
 }

 for (MyBaseClass object : objects) {
    object.protectedMethod(other); 
 }   
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but why it still don't compile in first scenario? Is there a way to modify first scenario to make it work without modifying Baseclass? –  jmoreira Oct 3 '12 at 14:05
    
Likely Baseclass is in a different package than Child1, Child2 and the calling code. You could make it work by making your own base class extending Baseclass, and putting it in the same package. That is, Baseclass<--MyBaseClass<--(Child1,Child2). –  Andy Thomas Oct 3 '12 at 14:22
    
It works! thanks for the help! –  jmoreira Oct 3 '12 at 14:38

Instance variables and Methods with protected modifier is only accessible either in derived class or in other class in the same package..

So, it might be possible that your Base class is in different package pkg1, and your derived classes and the class from where you are using the protected method are in the same package pkg2, different from the base class package pkg1..

Then by above property, you would be able to access the methods of derived class since they are in same package.. But, since base class is in different package, and also not the super class of your test class.. It cannot be accessed..

EDIT :- Ok, here is what you can do in case you cannot change your Base Class..

for (BaseClass object : objects) {
    if (object instanceof Child1) {
        ((Child1)object).protectedMethod(other);

    } else if(object instanceof Child2) {
        ((Child1)object).protectedMethod(other);
    }
}

But, that vanishes all polymorphic stuff from your problem... This is just a workaround..

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Is there a way to modify first scenario to make it work without modifying Baseclass? –  jmoreira Oct 3 '12 at 14:06
    
@Jams.. There is only one way, if you don't want to modify base class.. Move all classes into the same package.. Your problem will be solved.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '12 at 14:08
    
I can't, cause BaseClass is from an external library –  jmoreira Oct 3 '12 at 14:08
    
@Jams.. So, you can move your derived classes and the Test class from package pkg2 to package pkg1.. You can change them right.. Define them under the same package that the base class is.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '12 at 14:09
    
@Jams.. Ok wait.. What external library?? –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '12 at 14:10

I would check this entry: Java Protected Method Accessibility

Protected is limited to the same package and children. If you need access to a method outside of the package, it should be public.

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