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I want to know what is the fastest way as possible to perform a method on each element of a 3D vector.

Suppose we have:

std::vector<vector<vector<CLS>>> myVec;

I want to do the following loops in the fastest way as possible:

 for(int cycle=0;cycle<10;cycle++) // do it 10 times
 {
    for(int i=0;i<myVec.size();i++)
    {
       for(int j=0;j<myVec[i][constant].size();j++)
       {
           foo(myVec[i][constant][j]);
       }

    } 
 }

It's well mentioning that the middle term index is always constant in my case. Is using std::vector fast enough or you suggest another type container?

Looking forward to your help.Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Is there a better way to define a 3D array? There is just something funny about: vector<vector<vector<type>>> –  Derek Oct 3 '12 at 14:03
    
@Derek No.I don't have better way in my mind. Do you?! –  batista cori Oct 3 '12 at 14:12
    
What architecture are you on? What's the target hardware spec? –  Peter Wood Oct 3 '12 at 14:31
    
Is your data rectangular? (all myVec[i][constant].size() are the same?) –  Arpegius Oct 3 '12 at 14:38
    
@lionbest No... –  batista cori Oct 3 '12 at 14:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Usage of iterators should be faster (you don't have to look up through the whole array on every call of foo).

typedef std::vector<CLS> v1;
typedef std::vector<v1> v2;
typedef std::vector<v2> v3;

for(int cycle=0;cycle<10;cycle++) // do it 10 times
{
    for(v3::const_iterator itOuter = myVec.begin(); itOuter != myVec.end(); ++itOuter)
    {
        const v1& vec = (*itOuter)[constant];
        for(v1::const_iterator itInner = vec.begin(); itInner != vec.end(); ++itInner)
            foo(*itInner);
    }
}

I didn't measure it, though (didn't even try to compile, so pardon any typos)

share|improve this answer
1  
Why would using indexes make you have to look up through the whole array on every call? Iterators being faster than indexes are a common missconception, please don't spread it! –  Luchian Grigore Oct 3 '12 at 14:15
    
No @LuchianGrigore you are wrong. Iterator are faster! Look here and here. –  Arpegius Oct 3 '12 at 14:34
    
@lionbest if you want to prove that, take a different example - something that can't appear to be faster because of numerous other reasons. Take a 1-d array and iterate over it, then I'll be convinced. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 3 '12 at 14:38
    
It's code for a 3-d non always rectangular array, not for a 1-d! –  Arpegius Oct 3 '12 at 14:40
    
@lionbest if iterators are faster, they're faster regardless of the dimensions of the array, right? –  Luchian Grigore Oct 3 '12 at 14:43

The following would be faster:

for(int i=0, int vecSize = myVec.size();i<vecSize;i++)
{
   for(int j=0, int currentLineSize = myVec[i][constant].size();j<currentLineSize;j++)
   {
       foo(myVec[i][constant][j]);
       //copy-paste this 10 times instead of having the outer loop
   }
} 

If you know anything about the sizes, you can perform some more unrolling.

share|improve this answer
    
What about using iterators? –  batista cori Oct 3 '12 at 14:12
    
@batistacori no, iterators are not faster. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 3 '12 at 14:14

Probably the "fastest way possible" (and the least C++-ish way possible, although it's still valid C++) would be along these lines:

const unsigned dim1 = 10; //first dimension
const unsigned dim2 = 20; //second
const unsigned dim3 = 30; //third
const unsigned nElem = dim1 * dim2 * dim3;

CLS myVec[nElem];

CLS *p = myVec, *q = myVec + nElem;

while (p < q)
{ foo(*p);
  ++p;
}

This eliminates all the calculation of indices, since foo() seems to depend only on the value of the CLS element in question, not on its position in the array. Of course, accessing myVec in a 3D-ish way becomes more complex (myVec[x * dim1 * dim2 + y * dim1 + z] and so on - just making explicit all the indexing calculations C++ normally does for you...).

Changing the loop around to "slice" the array so that one dimension is kept constant would make it a little more complicated (essentially make it a doubly nested loop that adds an additional offset to the pointer at the termination of the inner loop). A bit like this (although I may have the dimensions reversed):

while (p < q)
{ CLS *r = p + dim3;
  while (p < r)
  { foo(*p);
    ++p;
  }
  p += dim2;
}
share|improve this answer
    
but dim1 , dim2, dim3 are not constant in my case. –  batista cori Oct 3 '12 at 14:42
    
@batistacori They don't necessarily need to be constant - I didn't see where they were specified in the original example (if they're not constant, you may need to do CLS *myVec = new CLS[dim1*dim2*dim3]; instead of allocating them statically, though). The main point was to allocate one single-dimensional array and walk through it in order to a) provide cache locality and b) avoid repeated indexing calculations. –  twalberg Oct 3 '12 at 14:54
    
filling out 1D array from 3D array needs another nested loop!!! So there is no difference –  batista cori Oct 3 '12 at 15:14
    
Thanks. I got what you said. Indeed it is the fastest way so far –  batista cori Oct 3 '12 at 22:58

You could create a recursive function object:

class Foo {
public:
    template<typename Container>
    void operator()(Container& container) {
        for_each(container.begin(), container.end(), *this);
    }
    void operator()(CLS cls) {
        // do what you want
    }
};

Foo foo;
foo(myVec);
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain it little more? Why would it be faster? –  batista cori Oct 3 '12 at 14:47
    
Try it and look at the generated code. –  Peter Wood Oct 3 '12 at 21:23

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