Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to look through a hash and compare it's values to an existing string and then when the match is found I want to output its key. I trying to write this in a code block and output the result to the console.

officer.name = "Dave"

@hash = { "Tom" => "97", "Dave" => "98", "John" => "99" }

@hash.each { |key, value| do
    if #{key} == officer.name
        puts "id: #{value}"
    else
        puts "no match"
    end
}

Right now my console outputs:

 id: 97
 no match
 id: 98
 no match
 id: 99
 no match

I'm trying to get it to output just the value of #{value} based on it's matching #{key}, which in this case would be Dave. So for the above example I want my console to spit just the number 98 or "no match".

share|improve this question
2  
Why wouldn't you just access the value using the key? Why iterate? Also, your title is the reverse of your code and text. –  Dave Newton Oct 3 '12 at 14:20
1  
if #{key} == officer.name : everything after the # is a comment. –  steenslag Oct 3 '12 at 14:54
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a hash! You can do what you attempt way more efficiently:

officer.name = "Dave"

@hash = { "Tom" => "97", "Dave" => "98", "John" => "99" }

unless @hash.key?(officer.name) 
  puts "no match"
else 
  puts "id: #{@hash[officer.name]}"
end
share|improve this answer
    
This works perfect! Thanks –  RubyDude1012 Oct 3 '12 at 17:26
    
Why putting an unless else end statement... ? –  oldergod Oct 4 '12 at 0:13
add comment

Is it because you forgot the " ?

if "#{key}" == officer.name

but you could just do

if key == officer.name
share|improve this answer
    
Or you don't need to interpolate at all? –  Dave Newton Oct 3 '12 at 14:20
add comment
officer.name = "Dave"

@hash = { "Tom" => "97", "Dave" => "98", "John" => "99" }

@hash.each do |key, value|
  if key == officer.name
    puts key
  else
    puts "no match"
  end
end

This should work

share|improve this answer
add comment
@hash.has_key?(officer.name) ? @hash[officer.name] : "no match"
share|improve this answer
add comment

When doing hash lookups by key, avoid #[]. Favor #fetch instead:

officer.name = "Dave"
@hash = { "Tom" => "97", "Dave" => "98", "John" => "99" }
puts @hash.fetch(officer.name, 'no match')

#fetch allows you to specify a default value other than nil, which will prevent unexpected nils from hash lookups from throwing the all-too-common NoMethodError.

share|improve this answer
add comment

this works too. slight edit from original post. it prints out answer for each pair though and doesn't identify which pair the answer refers to.

officer = "Dave"

@hash = { "Tom" => "97", "Dave" => "98", "John" => "99" }

@hash.each do |key, value|
    if key == officer
    puts key
  else
    puts "no match"
  end
end
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.