Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been trying to use the python multiprocessing package to speed up some physics simulations I'm doing by taking advantage of the multiple cores of my computer.

I noticed that when I run my simulation at most 3 of the 12 cores are used. In fact, when I start the simulation it initially uses 3 of the cores, and then after a while it goes to 1 core. Sometimes only one or two cores are used from the start. I have not been able to figure out why (I basically change nothing, except closing a few terminal windows (without any active processes)). (The OS is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0, Python version is 2.6.5.)

I experimented by varying the number of chunks (between 2 and 120) into which the work is split (i.e. the number of processes that are created), but this seems to have no effect.

I looked for info about this problem online and read through most of the related questions on this site (e.g. one, two) but could not find a solution.

(Edit: I just tried running the code under Windows 7 and it's using all available cores alright. I still want to fix this for the RHEL, though.)

Here's my code (with the physics left out):

from multiprocessing import Queue, Process, current_process

def f(q,start,end): #a dummy function to be passed as target to Process
    q.put(mc_sim(start,end))

def mc_sim(start,end): #this is where the 'physics' is 
    p=current_process()
    print "starting", p.name, p.pid        
    sum_=0
    for i in xrange(start,end):
        sum_+=i
    print "exiting", p.name, p.pid
    return sum_

def main():
    NP=0 #number of processes
    total_steps=10**8
    chunk=total_steps/10
    start=0
    queue=Queue()
    subprocesses=[]
    while start<total_steps:
        p=Process(target=f,args=(queue,start,start+chunk))
        NP+=1
        print 'delegated %s:%s to subprocess %s' % (start, start+chunk, NP)
        p.start()
        start+=chunk
        subprocesses.append(p)
    total=0
    for i in xrange(NP):
        total+=queue.get()
    print "total is", total
    #two lines for consistency check:    
    # alt_total=mc_sim(0,total_steps)
    # print "alternative total is", alt_total
    while subprocesses:
        subprocesses.pop().join()

if __name__=='__main__':
    main()

(In fact the code is based on Alex Martelli's answer here.)

Edit 2: eventually the problem resolved itself without me understanding how. I did not change the code nor am I aware of having changed anything related to the OS. In spite of that, now all cores are used when I run the code. Perhaps the problem will reappear later on, but for now I choose to not investigate further, as it works. Thanks to everyone for the help.

share|improve this question
    
I would try to first join the process and to calcluate the sum afterwards. Your solution looks strange to me. If it does not help, provide more debug output so that we can see where your processes get blocked. Have you checked how many processes are started? If only 3 cores are used, you can have only 3 processes or much more but sleeping ones. That's a diffrence which would be helpful to know. –  Achim Oct 3 '12 at 14:40
5  
@tehwalrus The GIL is only relevant when dealing with threads of the same process. Multiprocessing avoids using threads specifically for that reason. –  tylerl Oct 3 '12 at 16:13
2  
The problem may be with the O/S. The multiprocessing module only guarantees that you'll be working with multiple processes. It's up to the O/S to distribute those processes between the available cores, AFAIK. –  misha Oct 3 '12 at 16:22
1  
@J.F. Sebastian: I've found no significant bug in multiprocessing.Queue in Python 2.6 on RHEL 5 or 6. I've used it just fine in multiple projects. @Tropcho: Of course you shouldn't be using range in Python 2.x - use xrange instead. When using many processes, use ps or top to examine their typical run state. –  A-B-B Oct 4 '12 at 19:05
1  
Hey all, pardon me for not providing an update earlier: eventually the problem resolved itself without me understanding how. I did not change the code nor am I aware of having changed anything related to the OS. In spite of that, now all cores are used when I run the code. Perhaps the problem will reappear later on, but for now I choose to not investigate further, as it works. Thanks to everyone for the help. –  Tropcho Feb 7 '13 at 9:33

1 Answer 1

I ran Your example on Ubuntu 12.04 x64 (kernel 3.2.0-32-generic) with Python version 2.7.3 x64 on i7 processor and all 8 cores reported by system were fully overload (based on htop observation), so Your problem, Sir, is based on OS implementation, and code is good.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.