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I've got to call a routine from a supplied DLL. This DLL takes 2 to 10 minutes to run, depending on the speed of the PC it is being run on.

I have put the DLL call into a BackgroundWorker thread so that the interface will remain responsive.

private object Load(string feature) {
  object result = null;
  using (var w = new BackgroundWorker()) {
    w.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
    w.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
    w.DoWork += delegate(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) {
      e.Result = DAL.get(feature);
    };
    w.RunWorkerCompleted += delegate(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e) {
      progressBar1.Visible = false;
      if (e.Error != null) {
        MessageBox.Show(this, e.Error.Message, "Load Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
      } else {
        result = e.Result;
      }
    };
    w.RunWorkerAsync();
    if (w.IsBusy) {
      progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Marquee;
      progressBar1.Visible = true;
    }
  }
  return result;
}

This works, but I can't call this method inline with other calls that are waiting on its results because it will immediately return a null value.

So, I stuck in a ManualResetEvent instance to try and get the method to wait until it actually had a value before returning:

private object Load(string feature) {
  object result = null;
  using (var w = new BackgroundWorker()) {
    var mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    w.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
    w.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
    w.DoWork += delegate(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) {
      e.Result = DAL.get(feature);
    };
    w.RunWorkerCompleted += delegate(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e) {
      progressBar1.Visible = false;
      if (e.Error != null) {
        MessageBox.Show(this, e.Error.Message, "Model Load Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
      } else {
        result = e.Result;
      }
      mre.Set();
    };
    w.RunWorkerAsync();
    if (w.IsBusy) {
      progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Marquee;
      progressBar1.Visible = true;
      progressBar1.Value = 0;
      const string statusRun = @"\|/-";
      const string statusMsg = "Loading Data...";
      int loops = 0;
      do {
        int index = loops++ % 4;
        tsStatus.Text = statusMsg + statusRun[index].ToString(); // '\', '|', '/', '-'
      } while (!mre.WaitOne(200));
    }
  }
  return result;
}

However, it appears that doing this causes all of my CPU time to be spent on the ManualResetEvent's WaitOne method and the Set() trigger is never called.

Has anyone encountered this behavior before and found a good workaround for it?

I have created a workaround for it in the past, but it involved creating a second thread to run the WaitOne method so that the first thread can process the DoWork code.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This works, but I can't call this method inline with other calls that are waiting on its results because it will immediately return a null value.

That is why the async and await keywords were invented. There is no easy solution for this that doesn't block the thread.

Since the DLL you are using apparently does not supply methods implemented using any of the Asynchronous Programming Patterns (like BeginOperation/EndOperation, or Task-Based Async Programming), you're stuck with a separate worker thread.

What you can do is:

Start your BackgroundWorker or Thread as usual, then return immediately. Do not continue with the operation which would have required the return value of the lengthy DLL process. Once the BackgroundWorker or Thread is finished, have it report progress, and in the ProgressChanged event handler, you can retrieve the result of the lengthy DLL process and continue with the operation. Alternatively you can use the RunWorkerCompleted event (might actually be a better choice).

In the meantime, you may have to disable all controls which could start the lengthy DLL process again, or which would otherwise issue invalid operations while the process is running. And as Henk Holterman wrote, do not dispose the BackgroundWorker like that.

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Are there problems with using a BackgroundWorker? I have done this in multiple projects, multiple times, and it has never caused an issue. –  jp2code Oct 3 '12 at 14:54
    
The way you used in in your code, it's okay, because at the time it leaves the using scope, the worker is already done. That only works if the background worker starts and completes in the same scope (which essentially makes the work it does synchronous, but whatever). But if you break the code into two pieces as I suggested, it won't work with using. You have to call Dispose manually after the work is completely finished. –  dialer Oct 3 '12 at 15:06
1  
If you do use async, you can simplify most of your code right down to var result = await Task.Run(() => DAL.get(feature)); –  Stephen Cleary Oct 3 '12 at 15:11
    
How does this work, Mr. Cleary? await is undefined and Task does not contain a Run method that I can see. Very interested, though! –  jp2code Oct 3 '12 at 15:20
1  
@jp2code async/await is a Visual Studio 2012 exclusive functionality. –  dialer Oct 3 '12 at 15:22

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