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Is it guaranteed that (-x) % m, where x and m are positive in c++ standard (c++0x) is negative and equals to -(x % m)?

I know it's right on all machines I know.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In addition to Luchian's answer, this is the corresponding part from the C++11 standard:

The binary / operator yields the quotient, and the binary % operator yields the remainder from the division of the first expression by the second. If the second operand of / or % is zero the behavior is undefined. For integral operands the / operator yields the algebraic quotient with any fractional part discarded; if the quotient a/b is representable in the type of the result, (a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a.

Which misses the last sentence. So the part

(a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a

Is the only reference to rely on, and that implies that a % b will always have the sign of a, given the truncating behaviour of /. So if your implementation adheres to the C++11 standard in this regard, the sign and value of a modulo operation is indeed perfectly defined for negative operands.

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Hmm, you use that a/b is rounded to zero. is it really? –  RiaD Oct 3 '12 at 14:52
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@RiaD It's just in the sentence before: "For integral operands the / operator yields the algebraic quotient with any fractional part discarded". –  Christian Rau Oct 3 '12 at 14:53
    
Oh, but I don't really sure what it means. because In our school and university we call fractional part positive number [0...1) and the integer part max number that is not great than x, i.e [-1.5] is -2 –  RiaD Oct 3 '12 at 14:56
    
@RiaD I don't know if it is really free for interpretation. You got 4.2, drop the fractional part (the numbers behind the .) and you get 4. Take -4.2, again drop the fractional part and get -4. What you talk about is the floor function, a special rounding method. But the standard talks about discarding the fractional part, which doesn't alter the numbers before the . in any way, it just removes the numbers after the .. –  Christian Rau Oct 3 '12 at 15:00
    
Oh, I see. There isannotation 80, that say what I want. –  RiaD Oct 3 '12 at 15:00

5.6 Multiplicative operators

4) The binary / operator yields the quotient, and the binary % operator yields the remainder from the division of the first expression by the second. If the second operand of / or % is zero the behavior is undefined; otherwise (a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a. If both operands are nonnegative then the remainder is nonnegative; if not, the sign of the remainder is implementation-defined (emphasis mine)

This is from C++03 though. :(

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I believe that this was not changed in c++0x, to maintain backward compatibility. –  PWhite Oct 3 '12 at 14:43
    
@PWhite In fact Wikipedia says it was changed to defined behaviour, I'll dig it up in the standard. –  Christian Rau Oct 3 '12 at 14:46
    
I think the last part (in bold here) was removed in the C++11 standard (at least, it is removed in the draft I have). Anyway, I don't see how the previous equality could hold if the remainder was not negative. Take for instance a=-3 and b=2: if a%b is not negative, then (a/b)*b + a%b => (-3/2)*2 + -3%2 => -2 + 1 => -1, which is not equals to -3. Or am I missing something? –  Luc Touraille Oct 3 '12 at 14:49
    
@Luc: In C++03 it's permissible for -3 % 2 to be 1 provided that -3 / 2 is -2. Your calculations assume -3 / 2 == -1, which is not guaranteed in C++03 (or in C89 btw). Although the standard only explicitly talks about the sign of %, because of the relation (a/b)*b + a%b == a it is of course also dictating the rounding direction for integer division: negative modulus => round-toward-zero, positive modulus => round-toward-negative-infinity. C99 and C++11 both tightened what was previously implementation-defined. –  Steve Jessop Oct 3 '12 at 15:24
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And the nice property of round-towards-zero is of course the very thing questioner is asking about: (-x) % m == -(x %m) and (-x) / m == -(x / m). Conversely the nice property of round-towards-negative-infinity is that there are only m possible values for the modulus, and these values are the elements of the mathematical ring of integers modulo m. –  Steve Jessop Oct 3 '12 at 15:28

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