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I am in the process of optimizing my code for matrix multiplication.

for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < SIZE; j++) {
        float tmp = 0;
        for (int k = 0; k < SIZE; k+=4) {
            v1 = _mm_load_ps(&m1[i][k]);
            v2 = _mm_load_ps(&m2[j][k]);
            vMul = _mm_mul_ps(v1, v2);

            vRes = _mm_add_ps(vRes, vMul);
        }
        vRes = _mm_hadd_ps(vRes, vRes);
        vRes = _mm_hadd_ps(vRes, vRes);
        _mm_store_ss(&result[i][j], vRes);
    }
}

But g++ complains that "*'_mm_hadd_ps' was not declared in this scope*". Why is that, I am able to use other SSE functions like _mm_add_ps ...

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1  
Did you #include <pmmintrin.h>? – Mysticial Oct 3 '12 at 14:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use #include <x86intrin.h>, it will include all intrinsics supported by the target processor. Including pmmintrin.h and alike is deprecated and not recommended in recent versions of GCC. Also make sure you target the SSE3 instruction set in your compilation, either by adding -msse3 option, or (better) by using -march= option.

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+1, but the only nitpick is that MSVC doesn't have that header. – Mysticial Oct 3 '12 at 16:30
1  
MSVC has intrin.h instead – Marat Dukhan Oct 3 '12 at 22:52

Horizontal add instructions (such as _mm_hadd_ps) are part of SSE3. All the other ones that you are currently using are SSE.

It seems that you've only included the SSE or SSE2 headers.

So you'll need the SSE3 header:

#include <pmmintrin.h>

It will enable:

  • _mm_addsub_ps
  • _mm_addsub_pd
  • _mm_hadd_ps
  • _mm_hadd_pd
  • _mm_hsub_ps
  • _mm_hsub_pd
  • _mm_movehdup_ps
  • _mm_movehdup_pd
  • _mm_moveldup_ps
  • _mm_moveldup_pd
  • _mm_lddqu_si128
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Oh I was doing <xmmintrin.h> thats for SSE only? – Jiew Meng Oct 3 '12 at 22:50
1  
Correct, xmm is SSE. emm is SSE2. pmm is SSE3. And more that I can't remember. – Mysticial Oct 3 '12 at 22:55

In addition to including the correct header as Mysticial pointed out, you might also need to add the -msse3 flag to g++'s command-line arguments in order to enable SSE3 instructions. This will allow the code generator to emit SSE3 instructions, and it will define the __SSE3__ preprocessor macro, which then enables the declarations in <pmmintrin.h>.

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