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I was wondering if there was an easy way in SQL to convert an integer to its binary representation and then store it as a varchar.

For example 5 would be converted to "101" and stored as a varchar.

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3  
What do you want for -5? "-101" or "11111111111111111111111111111100"? –  Constantin Sep 24 '08 at 16:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Following could be coded into a function. You would need to trim off leading zeros to meet requirements of your question.

declare @intvalue int
set @intvalue=5

declare @vsresult varchar(64)
declare @inti int
select @inti = 64, @vsresult = ''
while @inti>0
  begin
    select @vsresult=convert(char(1), @intvalue % 2)+@vsresult
    select @intvalue = convert(int, (@intvalue / 2)), @inti=@inti-1
  end
select @vsresult
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Actually this is REALLY SIMPLE using plain old SQL. Just use bitwise ANDs. I was a bit amazed that there wasn't a simple solution posted online (that didn't invovled UDFs). In my case I really wanted to check if bits were on or off (the data is coming from dotnet eNums).

Accordingly here is an example that will give you seperately and together - bit values and binary string (the big union is just a hacky way of producing numbers that will work accross DBs:

    select t.Number
    , cast(t.Number & 64 as bit) as bit7
    , cast(t.Number & 32 as bit) as bit6
    , cast(t.Number & 16 as bit) as bit5
    , cast(t.Number & 8 as bit) as bit4
    , cast(t.Number & 4 as bit) as bit3
    , cast(t.Number & 2 as bit)  as bit2
    ,cast(t.Number & 1 as bit) as bit1

    , cast(cast(t.Number & 64 as bit) as CHAR(1)) 
    +cast( cast(t.Number & 32 as bit) as CHAR(1))
    +cast( cast(t.Number & 16 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
    +cast( cast(t.Number & 8 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
    +cast( cast(t.Number & 4 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
    +cast( cast(t.Number & 2 as bit)   as CHAR(1))
    +cast(cast(t.Number & 1 as bit)  as CHAR(1)) as binary_string
    --to explicitly answer the question, on MSSQL without using REGEXP (which would make it simple)
    ,SUBSTRING(cast(cast(t.Number & 64 as bit) as CHAR(1)) 
                    +cast( cast(t.Number & 32 as bit) as CHAR(1))
                    +cast( cast(t.Number & 16 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
                    +cast( cast(t.Number & 8 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
                    +cast( cast(t.Number & 4 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
                    +cast( cast(t.Number & 2 as bit)   as CHAR(1))
                    +cast(cast(t.Number & 1 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
                    ,
                    PATINDEX('%1%', cast(cast(t.Number & 64 as bit) as CHAR(1)) 
                                        +cast( cast(t.Number & 32 as bit) as CHAR(1))
                                        +cast( cast(t.Number & 16 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
                                        +cast( cast(t.Number & 8 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
                                        +cast( cast(t.Number & 4 as bit)  as CHAR(1))
                                        +cast( cast(t.Number & 2 as bit)   as CHAR(1))
                                        +cast(cast(t.Number & 1 as bit)  as CHAR(1)  )
                    )
,99)


from (select 1 as Number union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 
    union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9 union all select 10) as t

Produces this result:

num  bit7 bit6 bit5 bit4 bit3 bit2 bit1 binary_string   binary_string_trimmed 
1    0    0    0    0    0    0    1    0000001         1
2    0    0    0    0    0    1    0    0000010         10
3    0    0    0    0    0    1    1    0000011         11
4    0    0    0    1    0    0    0    0000100         100
5    0    0    0    0    1    0    1    0000101         101
6    0    0    0    0    1    1    0    0000110         110
7    0    0    0    0    1    1    1    0000111         111
8    0    0    0    1    0    0    0    0001000         1000
9    0    0    0    1    0    0    1    0001001         1001
10   0    0    0    1    0    1    0    0001010         1010
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+1 for an expression I can use as a computed column –  Gabe Jul 24 '12 at 0:55

Please see this blog post, Converting Integers to Binary Strings, I posted a while back.

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That's a clever way to do it! –  Jeff Sep 24 '10 at 20:33
declare @i int /* input */
set @i = 42

declare @result varchar(32) /* SQL Server int is 32 bits wide */
set @result = ''
while 1 = 1 begin
  select @result = convert(char(1), @i % 2) + @result,
         @i = convert(int, @i / 2)
  if @i = 0 break
end

select @result
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this is a generic base converter

http://dpatrickcaldwell.blogspot.com/2009/05/converting-decimal-to-hexadecimal-with.html

you can do

select reverse(dbo.ConvertToBase(5, 2))   -- 101
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declare @intVal Int 
set @intVal = power(2,12)+ power(2,5) + power(2,1);
With ComputeBin (IntVal, BinVal,FinalBin)
As
    (
    Select @IntVal IntVal, @intVal %2 BinVal , convert(nvarchar(max),(@intVal %2 ))     FinalBin
    Union all
    Select IntVal /2, (IntVal /2) %2, convert(nvarchar(max),(IntVal /2) %2) + FinalBin     FinalBin
    From ComputeBin
    Where IntVal /2 > 0
)
select FinalBin from ComputeBin where intval = ( select min(intval) from ComputeBin);
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I believe the last line of your code could be changed to SELECT FinalBin FROM ComputeBin WHERE intval = 1 The min should always be one in this code. Also, this code only works for positive numbers, FYI. –  Kevin Dec 1 at 14:34

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