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I have an abstract class for database-agnostic cursor actions. Derived from that, there are classes that implement the abstract methods for handling database-specific stuff.

The problem is, the base class ctor needs to call an abstract method - when the ctor is called, it needs to initialize the database-specific cursor.

I know why this shouldn't be done, I don't need that explanation!

This is my first implementation, that obviously doesn't work - it's the textbook "wrong way" of doing it. The overridden method accesses a field from the derived class, which is not yet instantiated:

public abstract class CursorReader
{
    private readonly int m_rowCount;
    protected CursorReader(string sqlCmd)
    {
         m_rowCount = CreateCursor(sqlCmd); //virtual call !
    }
    protected abstract int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd);

    //...other (non-abstract) methods that assume a cursor exists
}

public class SqlCursorReader : CursorReader
{
    private SqlConnection m_sqlConnection;

    public SqlCursorReader(string sqlCmd, SqlConnection sqlConnection)
    {
        m_sqlConnection = sqlConnection;     //field initialized here
    }
    protected override int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd)
    {
        //uses not-yet-initialized member *m_sqlConnection*
        //so this throws a NullReferenceException
        var cursor = new SqlCursor(sqlCmd, m_sqlConnection); 
        cursor.Create();
        return cursor.Count();
    }
}

I will follow up with an answer on my attempts to fix this...

UPDATE

The overridden method CreateCursor() creates an actual cursor in a database. This is paramount for the correct functioning of many methods that were ommitted from the class.
CreateCursor() must be called in the base ctor in order for the class to be in a consistent state when the ctor returns. I've slightly updated the code above to reflect this.

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5 Answers 5

You could always have a lazy property that gets the count.

public abstract class CursorReader
{
    private int? m_rowCount;
    protected CursorReader()
    {

    }
    protected abstract int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd);
    protected int RowCount {
      get {
          if (m_RowCount == null)
          {
             m_RowCount = CreateCursor(sql);
          }
          return m_RowCount.Value;
      }

    }
}
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@hunter its the same thing. for Nullable types, I like to check for null. –  Daniel A. White Oct 3 '12 at 15:35
    
does CursorReader know what sql is? –  hunter Oct 3 '12 at 15:41
    
Your getter prevents the JIT to use the inlining feature. –  C Sharper Oct 3 '12 at 15:43
    
@CSharper: Well, it could be one-lined (and inlined) using return (rowCount ?? (rowCount = CreateCursor(sql))).Value so it's not that big of a deal. –  Patrick Oct 3 '12 at 15:49
    
I do not mean, that you cannot write it on one line! But the JIT can only use inlining on simple getters. And your Code isn't simple. –  C Sharper Oct 3 '12 at 16:56

How about:

public abstract class CursorReader
{
    private int? m_rowCount = null;
    private int rowCount { get { return m_rowCount = m_rowCount ?? CreateCursor(sqlCmd); } }
    protected CursorReader() { }
    protected abstract int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd);
}
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does CursorReader know what sqlCmd is? –  hunter Oct 3 '12 at 15:44
    
@hunter It's just a snippet from the OP. I assume it's exposed but the real abstract class. –  flem Oct 3 '12 at 17:27

You probably need to separate your logic into a constructor and an initialization.

public abstract class CursorReader
{
    private readonly int m_rowCount;
    protected CursorReader()
    {

    }

    protected void Init()
    {
         m_rowCount = CreateCursor(sqlCmd); //virtual call !
    }

    protected abstract int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd);
}

This would require you to call Init() on every new instance, but it's the best solution that I can think of.

Note that Init could be called from derived classes like you mentioned, but I think it would be simpler to call it from calling code. There are a lot of types that use this pattern, and even though it requires more code, it's not a bad practice.

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What do you mean by "it would be simpler to call it from calling code" ? Also, check the update to my question - CreateCursor() should really get called while constructing the object. Maybe take a look at my own answer, it looks like it's headed in a similar direction. –  Cristi Diaconescu Oct 3 '12 at 19:57

Here's the 2nd direction I'm thinking about:

In order to side-step the chicken-and-egg problem, while allowing eager creation of the cursor, some abstraction is in order.

In the base class, the virtual call tries to access a not-yet-initialized field in the derived class. So let's extract the functionality of creating a cursor in a different class. The base class isn't interested in how it's created, it's just a step in a larger algorithm.

The gist of this approach, to me, looks similar to the strategy pattern - a master class knows the general steps of an algorithm, while actual implementation details for the steps are plugged-in at runtime.

public interface ICursorCreator {
    int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd);
}
public abstract class CursorReader
{
    private readonly int m_rowCount;
    protected CursorReader(string sqlCmd, ICursorCreator creator)
    {
         m_rowCount = creator.CreateCursor(sqlCmd); //no longer a virtual call 
    }
    //protected abstract int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd);//no longer needed

    //...other (non-abstract) methods that assume a cursor exists
}

//move the logic of creating a cursor in a separate class, and pass an instance of that to the base class. 
public SqlCursorCreator: ICursorCreator {
    private SqlConnection m_sqlConnection;
    public SqlCursorCreator(SqConnection conn){
        m_sqlConnection = conn;
    }
    public int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd)
    {
        var cursor = new SqlCursor(sqlCmd, m_sqlConnection); 
        cursor.Create();
        return cursor.Count();
    }
}

public class SqlCursorReader : CursorReader
{
    //private SqlConnection m_sqlConnection;//no longer needed

    //by saving the connection in the factory, it will be available when needed later
    public SqlCursorReader(string sqlCmd, SqlConnection sqlConnection)
        :this(sqlCmd, new SqlCursorCreator(sqlConnection))
    { }
    protected SqlCursorReader(string sqlCmd, SqlCursorCreator creator)
        : base(sqlCmd, creator)
    { }
}
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The 1st try was to move the virtual call out of the base ctor, but it has some down-sides:

  • m_rowCount is no longer readonly
  • the derived class AND ALL FUTURE DERIVED CLASSES need to call the base class Initialize() method.

-

public abstract class CursorReader
{
    private int m_rowCount;//no longer read-only
    protected CursorReader()
    {
        //no virtual call here
    }
    protected abstract int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd);
    protected void Initialize()
    {
         //virtual call moved here
         m_rowCount = CreateCursor(sqlCmd); //virtual call !
    }
}
public class SqlCursorReader : CursorReader
{
    private SqlConnection m_sqlConnection;

    public SqlCursorReader(string sqlCmd, SqlConnection sqlConnection)
    {
        m_sqlConnection = sqlConnection;

        //the derived classes NEED to call the base class' Initialize() 
        Initialize();
    }
    protected override int CreateCursor(string sqlCmd)
    {
        //uses not-yet-initialized member m_sqlConnection
        var cursor = new CustomCursor(sqlCmd, m_sqlConnection); 
        return cursor.Count();
    }
}

I especially don't like the 2nd bullet...

share|improve this answer
    
Is this an answer or an update? It looks like it should just be part of the question. –  Kendall Frey Oct 3 '12 at 15:37
    
@Kendall It's one possible answer. I was hoping to get some constructive criticism for it. –  Cristi Diaconescu Oct 3 '12 at 18:26

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