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I have a following form Form3 that is opened by another form Form1, and when closed Form1 opens back up.

The problem is when I close Form3 DoSomething keeps running after form is closed.

I understand that I can make DoSomething into a thread and set IsBackground = true but is there another way to stop all processes when form closes.

This code is just example, For illustration.

   public partial class Form3 : Form
    {

    public Form3()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }
    private void DoSomething()
    {
        int i = 0;
        while(true)
        {
            if (!this.IsDisposed)
            {
                Application.DoEvents();
                i++;
                Thread.Sleep(10);
                label1.Text = i.ToString();
                dataGridView1.Rows.Add();
            }
        }
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        DoSomething();
    }

    private void Form3_FormClosed(object sender, FormClosedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.Dispose();
        Form1.Default.Show();
    }

}
share|improve this question
3  
You probably meant while (!this.IsDisposed) { instead of while (true) { if (!this.IsDisposed) { – cdhowie Oct 3 '12 at 15:52
    
No I wanted while(true) to create endless loop to illustrate the problem. Once form is closed DoSomething should stop execution, but I am not sure how to accomplish that without using threads. – Andrew Rokicki Oct 3 '12 at 15:56
2  
while (true) { does not illustrate the problem, it is the problem. – cdhowie Oct 3 '12 at 15:59
    
if I make while (!this.IsDisposed) I still have the same problem. Ofter close DoSomething is running the loop event though !this.IsDisposed shows false in the watch. I get error "No row can be added to a DataGridView control that does not have columns. Columns must be added first." – Andrew Rokicki Oct 3 '12 at 16:09
1  
That is because you don't synchronize termination of the method. If you dispose the form while Thread.Sleep() is executing, the thread will wake up and continue on its way trying to do stuff on disposed objects. The problem isn't that the loop doesn't terminate, it's that you're not waiting for it to terminate before disposing the form, which means that you need to use something other than IsDisposed as your "abort" flag. It would also help to move DoEvents() to be the last call in the loop, so that when control returns to this method, the "abort" flag is the first thing you check. – cdhowie Oct 3 '12 at 16:13

You never break out of the while(true). You should either break the loop when it's IsDisposed is true, change your while loop to while(!IsDisposed), or store use a class level variable that determines when to break the loop.

I would probably opt for the latter, as it gives you a little more control.

public partial class Form3 : Form
{
    volatile bool clDoSomething;

    public Form3()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }
    private void DoSomething()
    {
        int i = 0;
        clDoSomething = true;
        while(clDoSomething)
        {
            Application.DoEvents();
            ++i;
            Thread.Sleep(10);
            label1.Text = i.ToString();
            dataGridView1.Rows.Add();
        }
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        DoSomething();
    }

    private void Form3_FormClosed(object sender, FormClosedEventArgs e)
    {
        clDoSomething = false;
        Form1.Default.Show();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Do not forget to make clDoSomething volatile, or the JIT is free to emit code that caches the value of the variable in DoSomething() which will lead to another (more difficult to detect) infinite loop. – cdhowie Oct 3 '12 at 15:58
    
Ah.. Good call. – Sheridan Bulger Oct 3 '12 at 16:00
    
On second examination, volatile may not be necessary here, since there is actually no threading happening. But at least it won't hurt. And, as I mentioned in another comment, it would probably be good to move DoEvents() to be the last call in the while loop, so that when control returns to this method, the abort flag is checked right away, instead of executing the loop body once more. – cdhowie Oct 3 '12 at 16:16
    
I always operate under the assumption where if you're not sure, take the safer approach until research proves it's not necessary. I've only used volatile for thread-safety concerns in the past, but it certainly can't hurt. – Sheridan Bulger Oct 3 '12 at 16:25

Your fundamental approach is flawed.

First off, Application.DoEvents should be avoided unless you are sure that you really need it, and that you are using it correctly. You do not need it here, and you are not using it correctly.

What you really need here is a Timer.

private Timer timer = new Timer();
private int count = 0;
public Form3()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    timer.Tick += timer_Tick;
    timer.Interval = 10;

    //when the form is closed stop the timer.
    FormClosed += (_, args) => timer.Stop();
}

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    count = 0;
    timer.Start();
}

private void timer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    count++;
    label1.Text = count.ToString();
    dataGridView1.Rows.Add();
}

When the Form is create the Timer is configured. The tick event is set, along with the interval. The tick event will look similar to your DoSomething method; it will involve running some bit of code every 10 seconds, from the UI thread, while keeping the UI responsive. When the form is closed simply stop the timer and it will stop firing off these events.

Also note that in this example here pressing the button multiple times simply resets the timer and the count, it doesn't end up creating two loops that each fire every 10 milliseconds.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP asked why his loop doesn't break, which is what my answer was addressing. This answer is a far more sensible solution to the actual use-case, however. ++ – Sheridan Bulger Oct 3 '12 at 16:35
    
That is a good solution but, the code I posted is just a sudo code for the real application for sake of simplicity and illustration and making a timer would not be applicable since the sleep(10) is used to simulate serial communication that is happening in the production app. I guess I should have posted that in original question. – Andrew Rokicki Oct 3 '12 at 16:46
1  
@AndrewRokicki Yes, you probably should have said that. In that case what you should be using is BackgroundWorker. The timerTick should go in the ReportProgress event handler, and the IO work should be in a loop inthe DoWork event. BackgroundWorker also supports cancellation, so you can have the loop checking if it's canceled, and then cancel the BGW when the form is closed. – Servy Oct 3 '12 at 16:52

Override this.Dispose() or this.Close() as appropriate and kill off DoSomething() manually.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to cdhowie suggestions and input of all others. Mowing DoEvents to the end and adding IsDipsosed solved my problem.

public partial class Form3 : Form
{
    public Form3()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }
    private void DoSomething()
    {
        int i = 0;
        while ((true) && !this.IsDisposed)
        {
                i++;
                Thread.Sleep(10);
                label1.Text = i.ToString();
                dataGridView1.Rows.Add();
                Application.DoEvents();
        }
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        DoSomething();
    }

    private void Form3_FormClosed(object sender, FormClosedEventArgs e)
    {
        Form1.Default.Show();
    }

}
share|improve this answer

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