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I have a class definition that looks like this:

public class MyObjectModel
{
   public int ObjectID { get; set; }

   //for when the user's data is split in 2 fields
   public string FirstName { get; set; }
   public string LastName { get; set; }

   //for when the user's data is all in one field
   public string FirstLastName { get; set; }
}

I have a list of these MyObjectModel and I want to sort them by name with a custom sort process because that involves checking if the data contains a LastName (in this case sort using the LastName) or just FirstLastName (in this case I'm going to break the string and sort on the second term, if there's one, or just the whole string if there's only one word.)

I'm not sure on two things:

  1. should I use IComparer or IComparable?
  2. Once it determines the order of the sort (I can do that), how do I make it so that the output of the method is a list of ints representing ObjectID.
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1  
Depending on the version of C# you're using, you can use Linq to sort it. –  Chris Laplante Oct 3 '12 at 16:08
    
For the precision, I'm using c# 4. –  frenchie Oct 3 '12 at 16:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use Linq:

  List<MyObjectModel> objects = new List<MyObjectModel>();
  List<int> ids = objects.OrderBy(o => FunctionWhichReturnsNameForSort(o)).Select(o => o.ObjectID).ToList();

FunctionWhichReturnsNameForSort can be implemented in another class, or an extension, or as a member.

// should be in a static helper class
public static string NameForSort(this MyObjectModel obj)
{
  if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(obj.LastName)) return obj.LastName;

  return obj.FirstLastName.Split(... // your splitting logic goes here
}

var ids = objects.OrderBy(o => o.NameForSort()).Select(o => o.ObjectID).ToList();
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What should the FunctionWhichReturnsNameForSort function return? Should it return -1, 0, 1 based on the comparison logic ? –  frenchie Oct 3 '12 at 16:20
    
It should return a name used for sorting. I will add an example. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Oct 3 '12 at 16:21
    
Ok, thanks; I'm going to combine this with Holterman's answer! –  frenchie Oct 3 '12 at 16:33
    
Quick follow-up: if the NameSort function returns an empty string, how is this going to be sorted? –  frenchie Oct 3 '12 at 16:36
    
Try it :) I believe that internally it uses Comparer<T>.Default to compare the objects. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Oct 3 '12 at 16:40

When you really need this strange double solution then you will run into this and similar problems more often. As a more general solution, consider putting the business logic for names in a few read-only properties:

//for when the user's data is split in 2 fields
public string FirstName { get; set; }
public string LastName { get; set; }

//for when the user's data is all in one field
public string FirstLastName { get; set; }

public string FullName
{
   get { ... }  // pick from LastName, FirstName, FirstLastName 
}

public string SortName
{
   get { ... }  // pick from LastName, FirstLastName 
}

Once it determines the order of the sort (I can do that), how do I make it so that the output of the method is a list of ints representing ObjectID

result = MyObjectList
          .OrderBy(m => m.SortName)   // sort on SortName
          .Select(m => m.ObjectID)    // select the Id
          .ToList();
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I like this idea: instead of doing the comparison on the object's properties, I do the comparison on the output of a function that returns the string I'm sorting on. Is that what you mean? –  frenchie Oct 3 '12 at 16:22
    
Yes. Sort on a special property, keep the logic behind it inside your class. –  Henk Holterman Oct 3 '12 at 16:30
    
ok, thanks for the idea! –  frenchie Oct 3 '12 at 16:31
    
Quick follow-up: if for some objects in the list the SortName methods ends up returning an empty string, how is the comparison going to work? –  frenchie Oct 3 '12 at 16:37

If this sorting is specific to one use case, it can be achieved using LINQ:

var sortedIds = models.OrderBy(SecondName).Select(m => m.ObjectId).ToList();

private static string SecondName(MyObjectModel model)
{
  if (!string.IsNullOrWhitespace(model.LastName)) return model.LastName;
  return model.FirstLastName.Split(' ').Last();
}
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Some lastnames have multiple parts (spaces). –  Henk Holterman Oct 3 '12 at 16:12
    
In the case where the name string has multiple parts, I'm comparing on the second string. –  frenchie Oct 3 '12 at 16:15

While you can use LINQ, as others have suggested, that would involve creating a brand new list, not mutating the existing list. That may or may not be preferable. If you want to sort the list itself that's easy enough too:

List<string> list = new List<string>(){"a","b","c"};

list.Sort((a,b)=> a.CompareTo(b));

Just take your list, call Sort, and pass in a lambda that takes two items and returns an integer indicating which is greater. In your case, just call some method on a and b to get a string and then use CompareTo or string.Compare on those two strings.

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