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For an audit table in sql 2008, I need to calculate the time each order is in a given step (represented as the new column).

 Old      New           Time Entered        Order Number
 NULL     Step 1        4/30/12 10:43       1C2014A
 Step 1   Step 2        5/2/12 10:17        1C2014A
 Step 2   Step 3        5/2/12 10:28        1C2014A
 Step 3   Step 4        5/2/12 11:14        1C2014A
 Step 4   Step 5        5/2/12 11:19        1C2014A
 Step 5   Step 9        5/3/12 11:23        1C2014A
 NULL     Step 1        5/18/12 15:49       1C2014B
 Step 1   Step 2        5/21/12 9:21        1C2014B
 Step 2   Step 3        5/21/12 9:34        1C2014B
 Step 3   Step 4        5/21/12 10:08       1C2014B
 Step 4   Step 5        5/21/12 10:09       1C2014B
 Step 5   Step 6        5/21/12 16:27       1C2014B
 Step 6   Step 9        5/21/12 18:07       1C2014B
 NULL     Step 1        6/12/12 10:28       1C2014C
 Step 1   Step 2        6/13/12 8:36        1C2014C
 Step 2   Step 3        6/13/12 9:05        1C2014C
 Step 3   Step 4        6/13/12 10:28       1C2014C
 Step 4   Step 6        6/13/12 10:50       1C2014C
 Step 6   Step 8        6/13/12 12:14       1C2014C
 Step 8   Step 4        6/13/12 15:13       1C2014C
 Step 4   Step 5        6/13/12 15:23       1C2014C
 Step 5   Step 8        6/13/12 15:30       1C2014C
 Step 8   Step 9        6/18/12 14:04       1C2014C
  • The steps are not required to be sequential, so step 1 can happen after step 5.
  • The records for an order are not stored sequentially by step or order, but rather are intermixed with other orders based upon the Time Entered. The sample data being ordered by Order Number then New is NOT normal and cannot be depended upon.
  • Each step can be repeated for any given order, if repeated for an order, then sum the times by step.
  • The starting step record is always null in the Old column
  • Starting step is calculated as the time difference between when it is in the New column and when it is the value in the Old column for a given order.

Output can be as simple as:

Order Number   Step      Time in Step
1C2014A        Step 1    6:09
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can you describe how the output should look like? –  w0lf Oct 3 '12 at 16:11
    
updated with sample output –  sreeli Oct 3 '12 at 16:15
    
Where did you get the 6:09 from (ie: given your values, how did you arrive at that number)? 5/2/12 10:17 - 4/30/12 10:43 is more than a day. –  NullUserException Oct 3 '12 at 16:18
    
Are you asking for someone to solve this for you, or do you have a specific problem or question that can be addressed? –  Jim Oct 3 '12 at 16:18
    
Sorry, the 6:09 is just a sample number and not the actual result. i was trying to get something up quick. –  sreeli Oct 3 '12 at 16:31

1 Answer 1

This is what I came up with:

select 
  a1.OrderNumber,
  a1.New as Step, 
  datediff(second, a1.TimeEntered, isnull(a2.timeEntered,getdate()))
    as [Time in Step (seconds)]
from AuditTrail a1
left join AuditTrail a2
  on a1.New = a2.Old 
  and a1.OrderNumber = a2.OrderNumber

For the steps that the order never came out of, the time is computed up to the present moment (getdate())

Online working sample: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!3/fbaff/11

Update:

The above query can show a step multiple times (ex: order 1C2014C goes through Step 4 multiple times).

To group by Order/Step and show the total time for each such pair, use this SQL statement instead:

select
  a1.OrderNumber,
  a1.New as Step, 
  sum(datediff(second, a1.TimeEntered, isnull(a2.timeEntered,getdate())))
    as [Total Time in Step (seconds)]
from AuditTrail a1
left join AuditTrail a2
  on a1.New = a2.Old 
  and a1.OrderNumber = a2.OrderNumber
group by a1.OrderNumber, a1.New
order by a1.OrderNumber

Online working sample: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!3/fbaff/14

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