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I am writing a C program like the following where I am assigning a value to a variable pointed by a global pointer, which is being changed by a function call on the right side of the assignment.

But the change occurs to the location where it pointed before. So for the following code, it prints

"GP:5 P:5 GPV:11" ,

where it should be

"GP:10 P:10 GPV:9"

I tried it compiling with both -O2 and -O0. Same output.

I know that it is fixed if I just break the assignment into 2 lines. But the project I am working on has lots of places like this.

Is this possible to make it work like I want without breaking it into 2 lines?

Any suggestion is highly appreciated.

#include <stdio.h>

int * gp;  
// volatile int *gp;   // I tried these two.    
// int * volatile gp;  // Didn't help.

int func(int *p) 
{  
   *p = 5;
   gp = p;  
   return *p;
}

int main()                                                                      
{                                                                               
   int p = 7;
   int gp_v;
   gp = &gp_v; 
   *gp = 8;
   *gp = func(&p) + *gp;
   gp_v ++;
   printf("GP:%d P:%d GPV:%d\n", *gp, p, gp_v);
   return(0); 
}
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2  
I'm afraid not. I think the best you can do is to try to make the problem more obvious. Maybe change the name of func to help you catch every place it is being used. –  Vaughn Cato Oct 3 '12 at 16:50
3  
I think your call *gp = func(&p) + *gp; is ambiguous. It completely depends on the compiler, which one will execute first. You should split them into 2 statements and then order them according to your needs. –  Raj Oct 3 '12 at 16:54
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This line has unspecified behavior:

*gp = func(&p) + *gp;

The C standard does not specify the order that arguments are evaluated in within expressions, so the compiler is free to execute func(&p) either before or after reading *gp for computing the addition. Likewise, it can evaluate the *gp on the left-hand side of the assignment (to determine that address where it's storing the result to) before or after it evaluates the value it's storing.

You need to break up your statement into separate statements in order for it to have well-defined behavior. Either of these would work, but they have different semantics:

// Option 1: write to old location of *gp
int *old_gp = gp;
int old_gp_val = *gp;
*old_gp = func(&p) + old_gp_val;

// Option 2: write to new location of *gp
int old_gp_val = *gp;
int new_val = func(&p) + old_gp_val;
*gp = new_val;
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1  
The program relies on unspecified behavior but is not undefined behavior. See DR #087 open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/dr_087.html where line B is not UB. –  ouah Oct 3 '12 at 17:36
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To keep it on one line, you'll have to wrap it:

#include <stdio.h>

int * gp;  

int funcPlus(int *p, int *pGlobal)
{
    func(p);              // alters the value of *pGlobal
    return *p + *pGlobal; // use the new value
}

int func(int *p) 
{  
   *p = 5;
   gp = p;  
   return *p;
}

int main()                                                                      
{                                                                               
   int p = 7;
   int gp_v;
   gp = &gp_v; 
   *gp = 8;
   // *gp = func(&p) + *gp; // undefined behavior
   *gp = funcPlus(&p, gp);
   gp_v ++;
   printf("GP:%d P:%d GPV:%d\n", *gp, p, gp_v);
   return(0); 
}
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I don't think this will help. As Adam mentioned, that if left side of the assignment is evaluated before the right side, it will still use the old location to store the value. –  Rakib Oct 3 '12 at 17:55
    
Sorry, fixed it. –  egrunin Oct 3 '12 at 18:51
    
Sorry, but I didn't understand your updated answer. Please note that, I am passing a different pointer to the function and updating a different pointer. I am not saying that my function will always be like this. My point was that I am calling a function on the right which changes a pointer that I am using on the left of assignment operator. –  Rakib Oct 3 '12 at 22:53
    
Fixed. The implementation details are less important than that by putting the code into a function you put the operations into a defined order or execution. –  egrunin Oct 4 '12 at 2:27
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