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I'm currently using the modified Gram-Schmidt algorithm to compute the QR decomposition of a matrix A (m x n). My current problem is that I need the full decomposition Q (m x m) instead of the thin one Q (m x n). Can somebody help me, what do I have to add to the algorithm to compute the full QR decomposition?.

import numpy as np

def gs_m(A):

    m,n= A.shape
    A= A.copy()
    Q= np.zeros((m,n))
    R= np.zeros((n,n))

    for k in range(n):

        R[k,k]= np.linalg.norm(A[:,k:k+1].reshape(-1),2)
        Q[:,k:k+1]= A[:,k:k+1]/R[k,k]
        R[k:k+1,k+1:n+1]= np.dot( Q[:,k:k+1].T, A[:,k+1:n+1] )
        A[:,k+1:n+1]= A[:, k+1:n+1] - np.dot( Q[:,k:k+1], R[k:k+1,k+1:n+1])


     return Q, R
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1 Answer 1

Maybe you should use scipy.linalg.qr which does have full and thin versions (mode parameter)

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I'm trying to translate some Matlab code to python, and I get different answers from scipy's qr and Matlab qr (mainly with the signs of the answer), so I figured I would implement my own version of qr –  user1316487 Oct 3 '12 at 17:12
    
Good. Do it yourself. Just keep looking for the answers on google. It seems that it is the kind of topic you need to discover on your own. –  Cris Stringfellow Jan 10 '13 at 8:45
    
@user1316487 QR decomposition is not unique. The results returned by both scipy and matlab are correct, so if your algorithm only requires a QR decomposition it will work fine. For an invertible, square matrix uniqueness follows if the diagonal elements of R are positive. For a rectangular matrix, a similar result holds (well, some part of the Q matrix is not unique in general). You should really use np.linalg.qr, which is just a Lapack wrapper like the matlab qr function. Your best bet is to understand what your algorithm really needs and implement that post processing. –  jorgeca Mar 21 '13 at 12:07

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