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I'm working with a web application that has a WCF web service with multiple calls. We are trying to segment the calls out into separate modules of calls belonging to the same business function, with a core module to house all generic settings.

However, we have a case where one of the modules needs a different database connection, but it's specific to the business function, thus not included with the core .config.

<configuration>
    <connectionStrings>
        <add name="connectionName" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"
            connectionString="Data Source=server,1111;Database=Whatever;Trusted_Connection=True;Min Pool Size=0;Max Pool Size=50;" />
    </connectionStrings>
    <system.serviceModel>
        <services>
            <service name="Foo.DataFeedService" behaviorConfiguration="FooServiceBehavior">
                <endpoint binding="basicHttpBinding" bindingConfiguration="FooBasicHttpBinding" 
                    name="Foo" contract="Foo.IDataFeedService"/>
            </service>
        </services>
    </system.serviceModel>
</configuration>

Essentially, this is just a service stub with the connection string. Each of our other .config files are structured this way, with the service model stubbed out in each, sans-<connectionString>. They all work correctly. Introducing the connection string causes issues though. Moving the connection string into the root config fixes the issue, it just goes against what we are trying to accomplish by segmenting each of the business functions out. Any hints?

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Are you trying to have multiple config files (config per module) and separate out the connectionStrings across each config (assuming these modules are all in the same app)? –  Phil Patterson Oct 3 '12 at 21:32

1 Answer 1

It is not possible to separate out connection strings across multiple config files or to define them in separate places in a single config file.

If you have one application, and you are trying to separate out settings by business functionality you could use custom config sections.

A. Define a custom config section class for each of the application settings for the service:

public class DataFeedServiceSettings : ConfigurationSection
{
    [ConfigurationProperty("connectionString", IsRequired=true)]
    public string ConnectionString { get; set; }

    [ConfigurationProperty("propertyA", IsRequired = true)]
    public string PropertyA { get; set; }
}

public class OtherServiceSettings : ConfigurationSection
{
    [ConfigurationProperty("connectionString", IsRequired = true)]
    public string ConnectionString { get; set; }

    [ConfigurationProperty("propertyB", IsRequired = true)]
    public string PropertyB { get; set; }
}

B. Add the config sections to the config file.

<configuration>
    <configSections>
        <section name="dataFeedServiceSettings" type="DataFeedServiceSettings" />
        <section name="otherServiceSettings" type="OtherServiceSettings" />
    </configSections>
    <dataFeedServiceSettings connectionString="[connectionstring1]"
        propertyA="value1" />
    <otherServiceSettings connectionString="[connectionstring2]"
        propertyB="value2" />
</configuration>

The config sections can also be located in separate files.

<configuration>
    <configSections>
        <section name="dataFeedServiceSettings" type="DataFeedServiceSettings" />
        <section name="otherServiceSettings" type="OtherServiceSettings" />
    </configSections>
    <dataFeedServiceSettings configSource="file1.config" />
    <otherServiceSettings configSource="file2.config" />
</configuration>

File1.config

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
<dataFeedServiceSettings connectionString="[connectionstring1]"
    propertyA="value1" />

File2.config

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
<otherServiceSettings connectionString="[connectionstring2]"
    propertyB="value2" />

The negative to this approach is that the connection string is no longer located in the connectionStrings section, but you gain the ability to group your "business modules" in their own sections and move the business configuration to their own files.

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Is this specific to WCF web services, though? We are using the same approach in our ASP.NET web application (breaking out connection strings into separate configs) and that's working correctly. –  dstepan Oct 4 '12 at 15:41
    
Don't have enough rep to up-vote this, but I do like this solution and will pass it along. –  dstepan Oct 4 '12 at 15:44
    
The connection strings can be put into a separate file (a single one) via the configSource attribute like I have done with the config sections, but I am unaware of a way to have mutiple of these. AppSetting can have mutiple via the file attribute, and it will merge the multiple into a single. This attribute does not exist for connectionStrings section however. stackoverflow.com/q/11121135/1027808 –  Phil Patterson Oct 4 '12 at 15:49
    
All this being said I bet there is an undocumented (or documented but I can't find info on it) way to accomplish the goal. There is a built in hierarchy where you can define in machine.config and then again in the web.config. Problem here is that if you define the same entry you get a duplicate key error. You can put a clear tag in the section but then you lose the values defined in machine.config. –  Phil Patterson Oct 4 '12 at 15:52
    
It just seems to me as if web.config files work differently in WCF as compared to ASP.NET and if that's the case, I'm curious as to why. Like you, I haven't been able to find documented cases of this issue, so hopefully this could be a help for someone in the future. –  dstepan Oct 4 '12 at 18:40

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