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I have an Excel file with formulas in this manner:

=IF(OR(ISERROR(G16),ISERROR(G17)),X16,IF(OR(G16="xxx",G16="yyy",G16="zzz"),Y16,IF(G16="333","N\A",IF(G17="333",Z16,IF(D17="",IF((HEX2DEC(W$10)-HEX2DEC(W16))/VLOOKUP(F16,$M$36:$N$41,2,FALSE)<0,0,(HEX2DEC(W$10)-HEX2DEC(W16))/VLOOKUP(F16,$M$36:$N$41,2,FALSE)), IF((HEX2DEC(W17)-HEX2DEC(W16))/VLOOKUP(F16,$M$36:$N$41,2,FALSE)<0,0,(HEX2DEC(W17)-HEX2DEC(W16))/VLOOKUP(F16,$M$36:$N$41,2,FALSE)))))))

I would like to simplify them so it will be written in a more readable manner.

  • Can I edit/write Excel formulas in indented way?
  • What kind of simplifications can I do?
  • Should I use an VBA script instead of Excel's formulas?
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2  
For a function this obnoxiously complex I would probably write a user-defined function in VBA so I can use indenting and make it far more readable. –  enderland Oct 3 '12 at 17:44
1  
Write a VBA function that incorporates your original code, and use that VBA function in your spreadsheet instead of the code. –  Robert Harvey Oct 3 '12 at 17:44
1  
If it's for your own use it can be useful to use helper columns to build the formula components. For some complex calcs it's even faster to calculate using this method. –  ooo Oct 3 '12 at 17:47
1  
@ooo Correct me if I'm wrong, but helper columsn means to put part of the formula in different cells and then reference those. For example: Instead of having OR(ISERROR(G16),ISERROR(G17)) in your formula, you could make the formula of some other cell =OR(ISERROR(G16),ISERROR(G17)) then in your complex formula it could just read IF([reference of helper cell]... instead of having the OR(ISERROR(G16),ISERROR(G17)) –  Daniel Cook Oct 3 '12 at 18:04
1  
To answer your questions: Can I edit/write excel formulas in indent way? Yes What kind of simplifications can I do? Break up the formula / Indent it / Writer shorter versions / User Helper columns as @ooo suggested Should I use an VBA script instead of excel's formulas? It depends. If I can do something via a formula, I tend to avoid VBA. –  Siddharth Rout Oct 3 '12 at 18:06
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As an example using helper columns, you could shorten the formula with the following

[A1] =VLOOKUP(F16,$M$36:$N$41,2,FALSE)

[B1] =HEX2DEC(W$10)

[C1] =HEX2DEC(W16)

[D1] =HEX2DEC(W17)

then the large formula is shortened to

=IF(OR(ISERROR(G16),ISERROR(G17)),X16,IF(OR(G16="xxx",G16="yyy",G16="zzz"),Y16,IF(G16="333","N\A",IF(G17="333",Z16,IF(D17="",IF((B1-C1)/A1<0,0,(B1-C1)/A1), IF((D1-C1)/A1<0,0,(D1-C1)/A1))))))

This is particularly effective when using volatile functions such as DATE or NOW which you don't want to recalc for every cell when it's the same result.

Whether it's more readable, perhaps not but you can label column headings with appropriate comments

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If you wanted, you could go a step further in readability and name your helper ranges. So you could have something like instead of saying A1 you'd put VLookUpOfWhatever, referring to the same range. ;-) –  Daniel Cook Oct 3 '12 at 18:26
    
I tend to only use named ranges or formula for building multi condition lookups. It's just a personal preference as they tend to slow me down. –  ooo Oct 3 '12 at 18:53
    
@ooo how can I apply this to 10K of cells in the most easily and safety way? thanks :) –  0x90 Nov 19 '12 at 16:20
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Naming some of the cells you refer to might make the whole thing more readable

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You can use Alt+Enter in the formula bar to make your formula multiline. Sadly, no tabs only spaces so it becomes tedious to create and edit. See also

http://www.dailydoseofexcel.com/archives/2005/04/01/excel-formula-formatter/

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A combination of helper columns and named ranges would make that formula quite simple.

In the following image you can see how named ranges can unclutter a formula:

Notice that "prices" is name for range A2:A7 and "inflated_prices" is name for B2:B7.

Notice also that names are intelligent: sum(prices) will sum the whole range, whereas =+prices*2 in B2 resolves to =+A2*2, =+prices*2 in B3 resolves to =+A3*2 and so on.

enter image description here

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That's a question I've always meant to ask - does =+ actually do anything in an Excel formula? Why =+A2*2 and not just =A2*2? Seems most prevalent in finance for some reason :) –  ooo Oct 3 '12 at 18:49
    
@ooo In my case when I'm going to enter a simple formula, say a A2*2, I hit + to enter the "cell selecting mode" to select the first cell by moving the arrow keys, whereas pressing = requires you to hold shift. Then once you finish entering the formula, Excel completes with =, leaving the formula like this =+A2*. I think most times you see a leading + in a formula is because of that. –  user1598390 Oct 3 '12 at 18:54
1  
@ooo, I believe Lotus used to use "+" at the start of formulas so I assume it's a hangover from that - redundant in Excel –  barry houdini Oct 3 '12 at 18:55
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You can simplify your formula substantially while still keeping a single formula. You are repeating almost the same expression 4 times with the HEX2DEC/VLOOKUP part, that can be reduced to a single instance if you recognise that this

=IF(formula<0,0,formula)

.....is equivalent to

=MAX(0,formula)

[for numeric results of formula]

and if you nest your IF(D17="".....expression within the main formula, i.e. this version

=IF(ISERROR(G16&G17),X16,IF(OR(G16={"xxx","yyy","zzz"}), Y16,IF(G16="333","N\A",IF(G17="333",Z16,MAX(0,(HEX2DEC(IF(D17="",W$10,W17))-HEX2DEC(W16))/VLOOKUP(F16,$M$36:$N$41,2,0))))))

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Since you asked about VBA code, I thought I'd give it a try. It's certainly more understandable and therefore maintainable, however the function has 11 arguments so it's a little unwieldy.

Function Magic(d17 As Range _
                , f16 As Range _
                , g16 As Range _
                , g17 As Range _
                , w10 As Range _
                , w16 As Range _
                , w17 As Range _
                , x16 As Range _
                , y16 As Range _
                , z16 As Range _
                , m36 As Range) As Variant


    Dim a As Variant
    Dim b As Variant

    If IsError(g16.Value) Or IsError(g17.Value) Then
        Magic = x16.Value
        Exit Function
    End If

    If g16.Value = "xxx" Or g16.Value = "yyy" Or g16.Value = "zzz" Then
        Magic = y16.Value
        Exit Function
    End If

    If g16.Value = "333" Then
        Magic = "N\A"
        Exit Function
    End If

    If g17.Value = "333" Then
        Magic = z16.Value
        Exit Function
    End If

    If d17.Value = "" Then
        a = Application.WorksheetFunction.Hex2Dec(w10.Value) _
                - Application.WorksheetFunction.Hex2Dec(w16.Value)
        a = a / Application.WorksheetFunction.VLookup(f16.Value, m36, 2, False)
        If a < 0 Then
            Magic = 0
            Exit Function
        Else
            Magic = a
            Exit Function
        End If
    Else
        b = Application.WorksheetFunction.Hex2Dec(w17.Value) _
                - Application.WorksheetFunction.Hex2Dec(w16.Value)
        b = b / Application.WorksheetFunction.VLookup(f16.Value, m36, 2, False)
        If b < 0 Then
            Magic = 0
            Exit Function
        Else
            Magic = b
            Exit Function
        End If
    End If
End Function

To make it easier to follow your formula logic (and I didn't know what the cells represent), I named the variables for the cell references. You'll want to rename them to something meaningful. The code belongs in a module.

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nice work, thanks! –  0x90 Nov 19 '12 at 15:54
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