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Even coming from javascript this looks atrocious to me:

irb
>> a = ['a', 'b', 'c']
=> ["a", "b", "c"]
>> a.unshift(a.delete('c'))
=> ["c", "a", "b"]

Is there a more legible way placing an element to the front of an array?

Edit my actual code:

if @admin_users.include?(current_user)
  @admin_users.unshift(@admin_users.delete(current_user))
end
share|improve this question
    
the question is not clear, you ask for a more readable way of "placing an element to the front of an array" (Array#insert(index, value)?) but the example uses delete and seems like you wanted a rotation. – tokland Oct 3 '12 at 18:04
    
I've rephrased the question. – Duopixel Oct 3 '12 at 18:31
    
ok, now it's clear. Has it to be in-place update, though? why not return a new array? – tokland Oct 3 '12 at 18:41
    
unshift is a pretty opaque name. Does it become more legible to you if you just alias it as prepend? – pje Oct 3 '12 at 19:04
    
@pje unshift is clear enough, but you must know that delete returns the deleted element to understand what's happening. In the end I settled for array.sort_by{|element| element == "c" ? 0 : 1} – Duopixel Oct 4 '12 at 4:24
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a trickier problem than it seems. I defined the following tests:

describe Array do
  describe '.promote' do
    subject(:array) { [1, 2, 3] }

    it { expect(array.promote(2)).to eq [2, 1, 3] }
    it { expect(array.promote(3)).to eq [3, 1, 2] }
    it { expect(array.promote(4)).to eq [1, 2, 3] }
    it { expect((array + array).promote(2)).to eq [2, 1, 3, 1, 2, 3] }
  end
end

sort_by proposed by @Duopixel is elegant but produces [3, 2, 1] for the second test.

class Array
  def promote(promoted_element)
    sort_by { |element| element == promoted_element ? 0 : 1 }
  end
end

@tadman uses delete, but this deletes all matching elements, so the output of the fourth test is [2, 1, 3, 1, 3].

class Array
  def promote(promoted_element)
    if (found = delete(promoted_element))
      unshift(found)
    end

    self
  end
end

I tried using:

class Array
  def promote(promoted_element)
    return self unless (found = delete_at(find_index(promoted_element)))
    unshift(found)
  end
end

But that failed the third test because delete_at can't handle nil. Finally, I settled on:

class Array
  def promote(promoted_element)
    return self unless (found_index = find_index(promoted_element))
    unshift(delete_at(found_index))
  end
end

Who knew a simple idea like promote could be so tricky?

share|improve this answer
    
It's been a while since this question but this looks good! – Duopixel Aug 12 '15 at 15:36
    
Thanks! I couldn't believe how far down the rabbit hole such a simple seeming method took me. – dankohn Aug 12 '15 at 15:38
    
This is good. Just an observation: your chosen promote presupposes that it is only supposed to move the first occurrence of promoted_element. Array#delete removes all elements matching the parameter. Would it be unreasonable to expect orthogonal behavior frompromote and that the result of your fourth test would be [2, 2, 1, 3, 1, 3]? To use your promote as a component in a method that moves all occurrences of promoted_element would require repeatedly duplicating the array and comparing (I think...). – Huliax Oct 29 '15 at 16:19
    
@Huliax What was nice about adding tests is that it makes by desired approach with promote completely explicit. If instead you want to "percolate" all of a certain element to the front, try something like: [1,2,3,1,2,3].sort_by { |e| e == 2 ? -1 : 0 }. [Rewrote to fix bug.] – dankohn Apr 19 at 21:01
    
Tests are great! Just as you say, my group often relies on them as part of our documentation. That said, it is really nice when you don't have to look at the tests to understand the behavior of a method. It is the pinnacle of self documentation when a method does just what you think it will when all you know its signature. Part of that is knowing how 'sibling' methods work (e.g. #delete). There is value in consistency. To me, that is one of the nice things about Ruby, that things do what you expect them to. Well, until they don't...Ruby has its fair share of that lurking in the corners... – Huliax Apr 20 at 0:45

In the end I considered this the most readable alternative to moving an element to the front:

if @admin_users.include?(current_user)
  @admin_users.sort_by{|admin| admin == current_user ? 0 : 1}
end
share|improve this answer

Maybe this looks better to you:

a.insert(0, a.delete('c'))
share|improve this answer

If by "elegant" you mean more readable even at the expense of being non-standard, you could always write your own method that enhances Array:

class Array
  def promote(value)
    if (found = delete(value))
      unshift(found)
    end

    self
  end
end

a = %w[ a b c ]
a.promote('c')
# => ["c", "a", "b"] 
a.promote('x')
# => ["c", "a", "b"] 

Keep in mind this would only reposition a single instance of a value. If there are several in the array, subsequent ones would probably not be moved until the first is removed.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm unfamiliar with the etiquette of extending native classes in Ruby. Would this be considered bad form as it is in javascript? – Duopixel Oct 3 '12 at 18:36
2  
Ruby on Rails has an enormous number of extensions to the Ruby core classes, so it's become a sort of tradition. It really depends. There's a fine line between clever and too clever. If you perform this operation in a lot of places, it would make sense. If in just one, I'd stick with what you have. – tadman Oct 3 '12 at 18:47

Maybe Array#rotate would work for you:

['a', 'b', 'c'].rotate(-1)
#=> ["c", "a", "b"]
share|improve this answer
1  
Good to know. Unfortunately it's not a matter of putting the last element(s) to the front, it's taking an arbitrary element and putting it to the front. I've updated my question and apologies. – Duopixel Oct 3 '12 at 18:33

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