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Is there a way, without a double loop to accomplish what the following sed command does

Input:

Time
Banana
spinach
turkey

sed -i "/Banana/ s/$/Toothpaste/" file

Output:

Time
BananaToothpaste
spinach
turkey

What I have so far is a double list which would take a long time to go through both.

List a has a bunch of numbers list b has a the same bunch of numbers but in a different order

For each entry in A i want to find the line in B with that same number and add value C to the end of it.

Hope this makes sense, even if my example doesn't.

I was doing the following in Bash and it was working however it was super slow...

for line in $(cat DATSRCLN.txt.utf8); do
        srch=$(echo $line | awk -F'^' '{print $1}');
        rep=$(echo $line | awk -F'^' '{print $2}');
        sed -i "/$(echo $srch)/ s/$/^$(echo $rep)/" tmp.1;
done

Thanks!

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3  
Your sed example is not equivalent to what you are actually trying to do. –  Andrew Clark Oct 3 '12 at 18:20
    
So in bash I was doing this and it was working, but super slow... –  user1601716 Oct 3 '12 at 18:21
    
you can actually run sed in python using the subprocess command. –  karthikr Oct 3 '12 at 18:23
4  
Look into re.match and re.sub, those are the rough Python equivalents to grep and sed. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 3 '12 at 18:26
3  
Your sed code, your bash code, and your verbal description of what you are doing are three different things. What are you actually trying to do? –  Francis Avila Oct 3 '12 at 18:44

3 Answers 3

Using re.sub():

newstring = re.sub('(Banana)', r'\1Toothpaste', oldstring)

This catches one group (between first parentheses), and replaces it by ITSELF (the \number part) followed by a desired suffix. It is needed to use r'' (raw string) so that the escape is correctly interpreted.

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It's possible to do this using tmp file with low system requirements and only one iteration without copying whole file into the memory:

#/usr/bin/python
import tempfile
import shutil
import os

newfile = tempfile.mkdtemp()
oldfile = 'stack.txt'

f = open(oldfile)
n = open(newfile,'w')

for i in f:
        if i.find('Banana') == -1:
                n.write(i)
                continue

        # Last row
        if i.find('\n') == -1:
                i += 'ToothPaste'
        else:
                i = i.rstrip('\n')
                i += 'ToothPaste\n'

        n.write(i) 

f.close()
n.close()

os.remove(oldfile)
shutil.move(newfile,oldfile)
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np, Nuked my previous comment –  tcaswell Oct 3 '12 at 20:20

If you are using Python3 the following module will help you: https://github.com/mahmoudadel2/pysed

wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/mahmoudadel2/pysed/master/pysed.py

Place the module file into your Python3 modules path, then:

import pysed
pysed.replace(<Old string>, <Replacement String>, <Text File>)
pysed.rmlinematch(<Unwanted string>, <Text File>)
pysed.rmlinenumber(<Unwanted Line Number>, <Text File>)
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