Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to install a Linux device driver without connecting the device?

I have complete access to the driver code. I'm using Linux Kernel 2.6.35.

I have tried insmod and modprobe to no avail. I am working on a custom driver (I didn't write it) but there isn't any documentation.

share|improve this question
    
insmod? modprobe? –  Paul Tomblin Oct 3 '12 at 18:28
    
A properly written device driver should not install if no instances of the device exist in the system. In some version of Unix the probe() function of the driver checks if the device is present. In Linux the probe functionality is incorporated into the _init() routine. If you insist on having the driver code in memory, then don't build it as a loadable module, but rather select the Linux driver to be part of the memory-resident kernel. –  sawdust Oct 4 '12 at 9:33
    
@sawdust That sounds like an answer to this question. Could you put the procedure to selecting the Linux driver as part of the memory-resident kernel as an answer to this question? –  rabidhamper7 Oct 5 '12 at 12:12
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A properly written device driver should not install when no instances of the device exist in the system (hot-pluggable device might be an exception). In some versions of Unix the probe() function of the driver checks if the device is present. In Linux the probe functionality is often incorporated into the _init() routine. When no hardware is detected, the driver should not register itself, and return status that would cause it to be unloaded if it is a module.

If you insist on having the driver code in memory, then don't build it as a loadable module, but rather select the Linux driver to be part of the memory-resident kernel. Building a driver as a loadable module is selected by typing an "M" in the menuconfig program. To have the driver built into the kernel, use the space bar to select the driver. The selection will be marked with an asterisk * rather than an M to indicate this difference.

(The text for this menuconfig dialog comes from Kconfig files. The product of this configuration dialog is the .config file, which has configuration symbols that are used in Makefiles to control the compilation of object files. The previous assumes that this driver has been incorporated into the Linux kernel source code tree. If all you have is the source code file, then you'll have to decide where in the source tree this driver fits. You then might be able to manually edit a Makefile to unconditionally compile the driver in that appropriate sub-directory. Or customize the Kconfig and Makefile files with a configuration variable for this driver.)

To keep all of the driver's code resident, you will have to make some minor code changes. Normally the initialization code and data are placed in text and data sections separate from "ordinary" text and data, and this memory section is freed once the kernel has finished booting. To prevent any driver code and data from being freed, remove the __init and __exit section specifiers in declarations.

Of course you will have to build a new kernel binary in order to incorporate this device driver. You should try to use the previous build's .config file before adding the driver.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this answers the asked question. I haven't had a chance to try it yet, but thank you! –  rabidhamper7 Oct 8 '12 at 12:40
add comment

Device drivers in Linux are (mostly) kernel modules. So yes! All you need to do is load the kernel module.

Compile the code to a kernel module, make install and modprobe <modulename>.

The documentation of your driver should've already told you that tho. ;)

share|improve this answer
    
<modulename> would be the modulename.ko file? –  rabidhamper7 Oct 3 '12 at 18:39
    
without the .ko part, yes. –  Gung Foo Oct 3 '12 at 18:40
    
P.S. There is no documentation with this driver, unfortunately. –  rabidhamper7 Oct 3 '12 at 18:41
    
I just tried it. Modprobe comes back with FATAL: Module modulename not found. When I try # insmod modulename.ko I get insmod: error inserting 'modulename.ko': -1 No such device –  rabidhamper7 Oct 3 '12 at 18:43
    
After asking around a little more, I found out that the driver code is what is causing the problem. I'm going to add some ifdef statements to block out code that accesses the PCI bus. Thanks for your help! –  rabidhamper7 Oct 3 '12 at 19:30
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.