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I'm a complete sql noob, so I apologize for the sql butchering that follows... Here's the pseudocode for what I'm trying to do:

count( 
   join( 
      select( * from table X where a='stuff' and b='junk' ) as X1
      select( * from table X where a='arg' and b='blarg' ) as X2
      select( * from table X where a='narf' and b='foo' ) as X3
   ) where X1.c = X2.c = X3.c
)

Is it possible to get this result in one query?

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this result - what result? –  RedFilter Oct 3 '12 at 18:36
    
do you want the result of all the items in the table with a='stuff' and b='junk' OR a='arg' and b='blarg' OR a='narf' and b='foo'? or are you looking for only items that have all three? –  jTC Oct 3 '12 at 18:38
1  
Please provide sample data and results. Your pseudo-code might not capture what you really want. –  Gordon Linoff Oct 3 '12 at 18:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I were to guess what you really want, it is the count of "c"s which have all three of the conditions in the a and b columns. If this is the case, the following works:

select count(*)
from (select c
      from table X
      group by c
      having sum(CASE WHEN a = 'stuff' AND b = 'junk' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) > 0 and
             sum(CASE WHEN a = 'arg' AND b = 'blarg' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) > 0 and
             sum(CASE WHEN a = 'narf' AND b = 'foo' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) > 0
     ) t
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amazing answer! gordon, can you please provide your thoughts on my answer? –  Yuck Oct 3 '12 at 18:46
2  
We are both interpreting the pseudo-code similarly (whether thinking alike is good or bad is a matter of opinion ;). Your answer overcounts the "c"s when more than one row meets one of the conditions. Newcomers to SQL often ask for count when they mean count(distinct). Also, I have a strong preference for using the having clause for testing for set membership, because it is the more generalizable approach. –  Gordon Linoff Oct 3 '12 at 19:05
select count(*) from 

(select * from table X where a='stuff' and b='junk') x1

join

(select * from table X where a='arg' and b='blarg' ) x2

on x1.c=x2.c

join

( select * from table X where a='narf' and b='foo' ) X3

on x2.c=x3.c
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SELECT c,
       SUM(CASE WHEN a = 'stuff' AND b = 'junk' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS X1,
       SUM(CASE WHEN a = 'arg' AND b = 'blarg' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS X2,
       SUM(CASE WHEN a = 'narf' AND b = 'foo' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS X3
    FROM table_X
    GROUP BY c
share|improve this answer

from table x

you want three sets of record each one is a selection from the same table X

  • X1 filter the records in table X where a='stuff' and b='junk'
  • X2 filter the records in table X where a='arg' and b='blarg'
  • X3 filter the records in table X where a='narf' and b='foo'

until now, we had three "logical views" that are independent subsets of X, respectively called X1,X2,X3

join ( ... ) where X1.c = X2.c = X3.c

interpretation might be a little ambiguous, confusing, let's try:

literally: c is the name of a field of table X

  • case A: c is a key (unique constrained), then each record of X (thus X1,X2,X3) have unique values of c , and therefore do not exists any record where X1.c = X2.c = X3.c; the solutions in this case is as simple as ==> SELECT 0
  • case B: c is not a key, but is a field that may contain repeated values; we can split this case in two ( or more ) possible interpretation
    • case B1: we want consider and count only those records where X1.c = X2.c = X3.c; this includes from subset X1,X2,X3 only those records that have values of c present in all the other subset.
    • case B2: we want count all the possible combinations of X1.c, X2.c, X3.c

All this cases seem particularly odd, so I advance another interpretation, a most common situation but not literally adhering to the concept of join:

we want count the union of X1,X2,X3;
in this case the solution is:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM X
WHERE (a='stuff'AND b='junk') 
   OR (a='arg'  AND b='blarg')
   OR (a='narf' AND b='foo')

Warning: I perfecly understand that "the union" is absolutely different that "the join" therefore this interpretation may be totaly wrong if you really did mean a join, but it seemed useful to explore the possibility of this meaning.

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