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I have a hashtable base class and I am creating different type of hashtable by deriving from it. I only allow it to accept objects that implement my IHashable interface.For example -

class LinearProbingHashTable<T> : HashTableBase<T> where T: IHashable
{
...
...
...
}

interface IHashable
{
    /**
     * Every IHashable implementation should provide an indentfying value for use in generating a hash key.
     */
    int getIdentifier();
}

class Car : IHashable
{
    public String Make { get; set; }
    public String Model { get; set; }
    public String Color { get; set; }
    public int Year { get; set; }

    public int getIdentifier()
    {
        /// ???
    }
}

Can anyone suggest a good method for generating an identifier for the car that can be used by the hash function to place it in the hash table?

I am actually really looking for a general purpose solution to generating an id for any given class. I would like to have a base class for all classes, HashableObject, that implements IHashable and its getIdentifier method. So then I could just derive from HashableObject which would automatically provide an identifier for any instances. Which means I wouldn't have to write a different getIdentifier method for every object I add to the hashtable.

public class HashableObject : IHashable
{
  public int getIdentifier()
  {
    // Looking for code here that would generate an id for any object...
  }
}

public class Dog : HashableObject
{
  // Dont need to implement getIdentifier because the parent class does it for me
}
share|improve this question
5  
Why don't you want to use the built in hashing function? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.gethashcode.aspx –  grieve Oct 3 '12 at 18:39
    
You are making your code complicated, override GetHashCode and Equal –  Cuong Le Oct 3 '12 at 18:42
    
Because it is an assignment where I have to create a hashtable. –  dukenukem Oct 3 '12 at 18:56
1  
Can you use a GUID? –  PHeiberg Oct 3 '12 at 19:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would split the problem in two:

  1. How to generate hash codes of primitive types: strings, integers etc.
  2. How to combine multiple hash codes into one hash code

using (1) and then (2) you can generate the hash code of any class or structure.

The naive way to do (1) for strings is to add the code of all characters in the string:

public static int getStringIdentifier(string str)
{
   int result = 0;
   foreach (char c in str) {
     result += (int)c;
   }
   return result;
}

Similar naive algorithms can be used for other basic data types (that are all array of bytes in the end..).

The naive way to do (2) is to simply combine the various hash codes with XOR:

public int getIdentifier() 
{ 
  return getStringIdentifier(Make) ^ getStringIdentifier(Model) ^ getStringIdentifier(Color);     
} 

These algorithms will work, but won't generate good distributions of the hash code values - i.e. there will be collisions.

If you want better algorithms you can have a look at how the .NET framework does it - here is the source code of the class used intenally to combine multiple hash codes, and here is the source code of the String class - including String.GetHashCode().

As you can see they are variants of the naive one above, with different starting values and more complex combinations.

If you want a single method that works on different classes the way to do it is to use reflection to detect all the primitive fields contained in the class, compute their hash code using the primitive functions and then combine them. It is tricky and extermely .NET-specific though - my preference would be to create methods handling the primitive types and then just re-define getIdentifier() for each class.

share|improve this answer

You should use the default GetHashCode method. It does everything you need. Documentation. It exists for all objects and is virtual so you can choose to override it if you wish.

I assume you know how to generate hashes for the primitive data types (ints, floats, strings, non-extended object, and a few others) and combine multiple hashes, so I won't bore you with the details.

If you absolutely must write your own generic hash function you could use Reflection. You would recursively hash each data member until you got to a primitive type where you'd have to manually handle those cases. There will likely be problems with certain data-types that have unmanaged data. In particular, one example would be a .net class that has a pointer to a class with an unspecified data-structure. Reflection clearly can't handle this case and would not be able to hash the unmanaged portion of the class.

share|improve this answer
    
the default GetHashCode method does not guarantee uniqueness. If you're using it for an id for the object, then collisions among identifiers are possible. –  earth_tom Oct 3 '12 at 18:49
1  
@tom_yes_tom That's true of hash codes in general and for any object with more than 32-bits of data it's impossible to generate a unique id anyway. –  CrazyCasta Oct 3 '12 at 18:50
    
i cant use hash code as we are supposed to generate out own hashtable and hash function. –  dukenukem Oct 3 '12 at 18:57
    
Well, GetHashCode doesn't implement anything wrt a hash table, it just gives a hash. As far as the hash function goes, it would be rather tough to implement. Especially if it had to hit any code with unmanaged stuff. I would say just override the GetHashCode method for the types you create and write your hash function (you should ask your professor if that's sufficient of course). –  CrazyCasta Oct 3 '12 at 19:02
    
agreed @CrazyCasta, re 32bits of data and re overriding GetHashCode instead of inheriting from a base class (unless that's a requirement). –  earth_tom Oct 3 '12 at 19:41

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