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I want to make a class with a member function that takes a reference to another class, where both classes are derived from abstract classes. I get a compiler error that the class Container is abstract because it doesn't implement addElem().

class Ielem
{
public:
  virtual void action() = 0;
};

class Elem: public Ielem
{
public:
  void action() {};
  void extra() {};
};

class Icontainer
{
public:
  virtual void addElem(Ielem &elem) = 0;
};

class Container: public Icontainer
{
public:
  void addElem(Elem &elem) { elem.extra(); };
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  Elem e;
  Container c;
  c.addElem(e);

  return 0;
}

It seems like this ought to work, because any reference to an Elem is also a reference to an Ielem. It compiles if I make Container::addElem take a reference to an Ielem. But then Container::addElem() can't call Elem::extra() unless I use dynamic_cast, which isn't available on the embedded compiler I'm using, or a regular cast, which isn't type safe.

Suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
There are very specific circumstances in which you're allowed to do this, and this is probably not one of them. –  Wug Oct 3 '12 at 19:09
    
Why don't you add pure extra() to the base class? –  jrok Oct 3 '12 at 19:09
    
In my real code, extra() is related to the specifics of the Elem class. it wouldn't be meaningful in other Ielem implementations, so I don't want to require its implementation by adding it to the base class. –  T Scherer Oct 3 '12 at 19:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is simply that your virtual method doesn't have the same signature as the concrete method which is intended to overload it; so the compiler sees it as a different function entirely and complains because you haven't implemented void addElem(Ielem &elem). This is one solution, which you probably don't want--

class Icontainer
{
public:
  virtual void addElem(Elem &elem) = 0;  //Ielem -> Elem
};

It depends on all your other constraints but I think what I would do--and what seems to conform to general design guidelines, e.g. Sutter & Alexandreascu, would be to create an intermediate abstract class with the full interface--

class Melem: public Ielem
{
public:
  // void action() {}; //Already have this form Ielem
  void extra() = 0;
};

and then

class Icontainer
{
public:
  virtual void addElem(Melem &elem) = 0;
};

class Container: public Icontainer
{
public:
  void addElem(Melem &elem) { elem.extra(); }; 
     //*Now* we're implementing Icontainer::addElem
};
share|improve this answer
    
The problem here is that extra() is now required for all Icontainer/Ielem implementations. extra() is only meaningful in the Elem class. (Also, Melem doesn't implement action(), and doesn't inherit it from Ielem, where it's pure virtual.) –  T Scherer Oct 3 '12 at 21:06
    
OKay, then maybe templates are your answer. Overriding requires identical signatures and there's no way to add interface to derived classes that's recognizable to the base class. –  Matt Phillips Oct 3 '12 at 21:15
    
I ended up using an intermediate class in a different way. –  T Scherer Oct 10 '12 at 0:30

It's the wrong way round: the base class Icontainer specifies that addElem can take any Ielem object as an argument, but in your derived class you accept only Elem. This is a "narrower" type, so the contract "I'll accept any Ielem you throw at me" specified in the base class is violated.

I think templates would be the solution here. You don't even need the base classes anymore. Something like this:

class Elem
{
public:
  void action() {};
  void extra() {};
};

template<typename ElemType>
class Container
{
public:
  void addElem(ElemType &elem) { elem.extra(); };
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  Elem e;
  Container<Elem> c;
  c.addElem(e);

  return 0;
}

As a bonus, you can now use Container with any type that has an extra() function, and it will just work.

share|improve this answer
    
I picked the other answer as the solution because I used an intermediate class, but your answer was the best description of why my code didn't compile. Thank you! –  T Scherer Oct 10 '12 at 0:35

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