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Is this the correct way to check for a missing parameter in a function? Would this work in all browsers? How about IE?

function getName(name){
    name = name != null ? name : "default";
    return name;
}
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How does one define "correct" in this instance? To give you the best answer, we'd need to know the contexts in which the parameter should be overwritten. –  zzzzBov Oct 3 '12 at 19:25
    
Recently, I asked whether it was possible to list the names of each missing parameter in a JavaScript function, and I found plenty of interesting solutions here: stackoverflow.com/questions/17387222 –  Anderson Green Jun 30 '13 at 5:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

you can do:

name = name || 'default';

That says if name is undefined or falsy (0, "", false, {}, []), set it to "default".

js(h|l)int will complain about it, but it works at least as far as back as IE7. It's not invalid code at all or relying on some undocumented behavior either.

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4  
This of course would make falsy arguments seem to be "missing." Depending on what you're doing, this could mean a lot of false positives. –  NullUserException Oct 3 '12 at 19:11
    
Yes it would. But if name is supposed to be something or "default" this guarantees it. If name can be false, "" or something else that's empty, then no, you can't use this method, but why set a default if you're not going to use it capture empty or incorrect cases. –  tkone Oct 3 '12 at 19:13
3  
There are cases where you'd want to have a default value if the variable is undefined while allowing 0 or empty strings to be valid values. What you're doing will butcher all falsy values indiscriminately. –  NullUserException Oct 3 '12 at 19:15
    
Falsy is not the same as missing. –  Ian Oct 3 '12 at 19:16
1  
This wasn't meant to be a dig at your answer; just pointing out possible flaws with this approach. –  NullUserException Oct 3 '12 at 20:05

The way to check for parameters depends on what type of information you're passing to the function, and how you want your function to handle edge cases.

In most cases, you can simply use:

function foo(bar) {
    bar = bar || ...default value here...;
}

However, it might be an issue if your code looks like this:

function foo(bar) {
    bar = bar || 5;
    alert(bar);
}
foo(0); //alerts 5, probably not what you wanted

So instead, you could typically check against undefined:

function foo(bar) {
    if (bar == undefined) {
        bar = ...default value...
    }
}

...however using the loose check allows both null and undefined to be overwritten (null == undefined):

function foo(bar) {
    if (bar == undefined) {
        bar = 0;
    }
    alert(bar);
}
foo(); //alerts 0
foo(null); //alerts 0

So instead, a strict equality comparison (===) is generally preferred (null !== undefined):

function foo(bar) {
    //if you're worried that undefined may be overwritten for any horrible reason
    //use `typeof bar === 'undefined'` instead
    if (bar === undefined) { 
        bar = ...default value...
    }
}

However, this could lead to trouble if you need to know whether undefined was passed as a parameter:

function foo(bar) {
    if (bar === undefined) {
        bar = 0;
    }
    alert(bar);
}
foo(undefined); //alerts 0, which may or may not be desired

If you want to be absolutely certain that you're not passing up an argument that was provided, you can check the number of arguments passed to the function:

function foo(bar) {
    if (arguments.length < 1) {
        bar = ...default value...;
    }
}

Which means that you can successfully pass undefined as an argument while also choosing to use a different default:

function foo(bar) {
    if (arguments.length < 1) {
        bar = 0;
    }
    alert(bar);
}
foo(undefined); //alerts undefined
foo(); //alerts 0

If you have multiple parameters, you may want to use multiple defaults. I've recently found a use case for fallthrough on a switch statement, although the utility is questionable:

function foo(bar, baz, fizz, buzz) {
    switch (arguments.length) {
    case 0:
        bar = 1;
        //continue; might as well point out that implicit fall-through is desired
    case 1:
        baz = 2;
        //continue;
    case 2:
        fizz = 3;
        //continue;
    case 3:
        buzz = 4;
        //continue;
    }
    ...code...
}
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1  
Quite comprehensive and a better answer for the range of problems. –  tkone Oct 3 '12 at 20:03
2  
Thanks for such a thorough answer. –  3coins Oct 4 '12 at 2:21

The correct way to check is

if (typeof name === "undefined") {
    // ...
}

Of course callers can still "fool" you by calling getName(undefined), when a parameter has been provided but the check will flag it as not-provided nonetheless. But that's really a pathological scenario.

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if you do the name = name || "default" method though, passing in undefined still works as you'd expect. –  tkone Oct 3 '12 at 19:10
1  
@tkone Jon is talking about a possible false positive. –  NullUserException Oct 3 '12 at 19:12
    
@NullUserException not when i left my comment. answer has been edited since then. –  tkone Oct 3 '12 at 20:04
    
@tkone: Er, no. Hover the times to see that the answer was posted 2 full minutes before the comment. –  Jon Oct 3 '12 at 21:21

Yes this would work in all browsers though if you want to see if it is defined you might use:

function getName(name){
   name = typeof(name) !== "undefined" ? name : "default";
   return name;
}
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