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I have a binary string, entered by the user, which I need to convert to an integer.

At first I naivly used this simple line:

Convert.ToInt32("11011",2);

Unfortunately this throws an exception if the user enters the integer directly.

Convert.ToInt32("123",2); // throws Exception

How can I make sure that the string entered by the user actually is a binary string?

  • try..catch....but that's just too ugly.
  • something like 'Int32.TryParse' maybe.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
How does the user enter the string? If it's a form, couldn't you limit it to accept only '0' and '1'? –  outis Aug 13 '09 at 12:19
3  
Why is try - catch "ugly"? –  RaYell Aug 13 '09 at 12:25
    
You are probably right, it is not that ugly. I actually went with it now because Hex value are suddenly possible aswell. So some simple try - catches are just the simplest and easiest solution. Thanks everybody. –  eric Aug 14 '09 at 5:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You could use a Regex to check that it is "^[01]+$" (or better, "^[01]{1,32}$"), and then use Convert?

of course, exceptions are unlikely to be a huge problem anyway! Inelegant? maybe. But they work.

Example (formatted for vertical space):

static readonly Regex binary = new Regex("^[01]{1,32}$", RegexOptions.Compiled);
static void Main() {
    Test("");
    Test("01101");
    Test("123");
    Test("0110101101010110101010101010001010100011010100101010");
}
static void Test(string s) {
    if (binary.IsMatch(s)) {
        Console.WriteLine(Convert.ToInt32(s, 2));
    } else {
        Console.WriteLine("invalid: " + s);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 That is what I was thinking as well. –  Andrew Hare Aug 13 '09 at 12:10
    
This doesn't correctly handle conversion of Convert.ToString((long)Int32.MaxValue + 1, 2). This should be rejected but is incorrectly converted to Int32.MinValue. –  Ben Lings Aug 13 '09 at 12:32
    
Why should that be rejected? It is a valid 32-bit binary value. If you choose to interpret it as int32 then sure: anything with the msb set is going to be negative... and? –  Marc Gravell Aug 13 '09 at 12:38
    
Thanks great solution. I actually went with it. But the requirements changed some what so I decided try - catch is the simplest and cleanest solution –  eric Aug 14 '09 at 5:54

Thanks for the great and incredibly fast answer!

Unfortunaetly my requirements changed. Now the user can pretty much enter any format. Binary, Decimal, Hex. So I decided try - catch just provides the simplest and cleanest solution.

So just for good measure I am posting the code I am using now. I think it is pretty clear and even somewhat elegant, or so I think^^.

switch (format)
{
    case VariableFormat.Binary:
        try
        {
            result = Convert.ToInt64(value, 2)
        }
        catch
        {
            // error handling
        }
        break;
    case VariableFormat.Decimal:
        try
        {
            result = Convert.ToInt64(value, 10)
        }
        catch
        {
            // error handling
        }
        break;
    case VariableFormat.Hexadecimal:
        try
        {
            result = Convert.ToInt64(value, 16)
        }
        catch
        {
            // error handling
        }
        break;
}

So thanks for encouraging me to use try - catch, I think it really improved the readibility of my code.

Thanks

share|improve this answer
    
What, you don't like octal? Seriously though, what if someone enters '11' and meant it in base 10? Standard solution would be to use a prefix ('0b', '', '0x'), but that may not fit your requirements. –  outis Aug 16 '09 at 7:13
    
Yeah no octal^^. The user actually has to choose in combobox which format she wants to use. I thought about your solution too, but it seemed easier with a combobox. Thanks so great input. –  eric Aug 17 '09 at 5:26

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