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I'm reading Practical Common Lisp, and have a question about Lisp's COPY-TREE function.

The book gives the example of calling

(copy-tree '( '(1 2) '(3 4) '(5 6)))

After explaining it, the book makes this statement:

Where a cons cell in the original referenced an atomic value, the corresponding cons cell in the copy will reference the same value. Thus, the only objects referenced in common by the original tree and the copy produced by COPY-TREE are the numbers 5, 6, and the symbol NIL.

But that doesn't make sense to me. I thought all atoms would be shared between the original and the new. Therefore, I expected that 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and NIL would all be shared between the original and the copy, and that the only "new objects" would be all the CONS cells.

Which one is correct, and why?

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I check the web-version, a pdf version and the hard cover. The first two are wrong as you state. The hard cover states this (bold emphasis is mine):

Where a cons cell in the original referenced an atomic value, the corresponding cons cell in the copy will reference the same value. Thus, the only objects referenced in common by the original tree and the copy produced by COPY-TREE are the numbers 1-6, and the symbol NIL.

So the hard cover book is correct.

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Excellent! Thank you. –  Charlie Flowers Oct 5 '12 at 3:01
1  
Surprising, though ... you would think the hardcover text would be the oldest version of the 3. Which would lead one to believe that it originally said "1-6 and NIL", and later someone intentionally changed it to "5, 6 and NIL". (Either way, I can at least feel confident there's no mystery about copy-tree that I was failing to grasp). –  Charlie Flowers Oct 5 '12 at 13:06

It is slightly more complicated.

The cons cells will be copied. Typically the objects the cons cells references will not be copied.

But there is one exception. Data like fixnums and characters can be stored inline in cons cells (and structure slots, class slots, arrays). Such data types are not necessarily EQ. That's why there is EQL.

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That makes sense, but I still don't see why he draws a distinction between "5, 6 and NIL" versus "1, 2, 3 and 4". And also, what would be shared between the original and copy if the atoms were more complex objects that do not qualify to be stored inline? –  Charlie Flowers Oct 3 '12 at 21:56
    
@Charlie Flowers: all cons cells will be copied. All non-primitive data will be referenced and not copied. To me it looks like Peter tried to explain the difference between COPY-LIST and COPY-TREE. –  Rainer Joswig Oct 3 '12 at 22:36
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Assuming I have it right now, I'd say he did explain the difference correctly, but then he threw in an incorrect statement about 5, 6 and NIL that created confusion about his explanation. –  Charlie Flowers Oct 3 '12 at 23:12

Peter Seibel is reasonably assuming that numbers are stored directly in a cons cell rather than by reference:

Footnote 4, Chapter 12. They Called It LISP for a Reason: List Processing

Typically, simple objects such as numbers are drawn within the appropriate box, and more complex objects will be drawn outside the box with an arrow from the box indicating the reference. This actually corresponds well with how many Common Lisp implementations work--although all objects are conceptually stored by reference, certain simple immutable objects can be stored directly in a cons cell.

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That makes sense, and I remember reading that. But in this example, what is different about 5, 6 and NIL, that doesn't also apply to 1,2,3 and 4? –  Charlie Flowers Oct 3 '12 at 21:53
    
@CharlieFlowers Hmm, I did not notice it. I think, your point is right although the spec does not prevent a Common Lisp implementation from behaving so. Incidentally, it reminds me of Python's behavior:The current implementation (of CPython) keeps an array of integer objects for all integers between -5 and 256, when you create an int in that range you actually just get back a reference to the existing object. –  dkim Oct 4 '12 at 2:01
    
The old Flyweight pattern. –  Charlie Flowers Oct 4 '12 at 7:01

The description is correct, the example is not. copy-tree would return the 1, 2 and 3 as is, copying only the cons cells.

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So, does that mean that, in the end, all of the following would be shared between the original tree and the copy: 1,2,3,4,5,6 and NIL? –  Charlie Flowers Oct 3 '12 at 21:00
    
In other words, does that mean the book is incorrect in this case? –  Charlie Flowers Oct 3 '12 at 21:01
    
@CharlieFlowers: that's right, the book is wrong. Only the conses are copied. –  larsmans Oct 3 '12 at 21:12

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