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I am trying to parse items out of a file I have. I cant figure out how to do this with grep here is the syntax

<FQDN>Compname.dom.domain.com</FQDN>

<FQDN>Compname1.dom.domain.com</FQDN>

<FQDN>Compname2.dom.domain.com</FQDN>

I want to spit out just the bits between the > and the < can anyone assist? Thanks

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1  
you can use sed on linux. unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/CGI/man-cgi?sed –  PL Audet Oct 3 '12 at 20:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

grep can do some text extraction. however not sure if this is what you want:

grep -Po "(?<=>)[^<]*"

test

kent$  echo "<FQDN>Compname.dom.domain.com</FQDN>
dquote> 
dquote> <FQDN>Compname1.dom.domain.com</FQDN>
dquote> 
dquote> <FQDN>Compname2.dom.domain.com</FQDN>"|grep -Po "(?<=>)[^<]*"
Compname.dom.domain.com
Compname1.dom.domain.com
Compname2.dom.domain.com
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thanks. works perfectly! –  n_hov Oct 3 '12 at 20:52
1  
@n_hov - I suspect this only works perfectly in Linux, since afaik that's the only place that grep supports PCRE. If you'll only ever be doing this in Linux, then this is a great answer. If you might possibly use FreeBSD, NetBSD, OSX, Solaris, HP/UX, etc, you should look t other solutions to keep your options open. –  ghoti Oct 5 '12 at 14:13

As others have said, grep is not the ideal tool for this. However:

$ echo '<FQDN>Compname.dom.domain.com</FQDN>' | egrep -io '[a-z]+\.[^<]+'
Compname.dom.domain.com

Remember that grep's purpose is to MATCH things. The -o option shows you what it matched. In order to make regex conditions that are not part of the expression that is returned, you'd need to use lookahead or lookbehind, which most command-line grep does not support because it's part of PCRE rather than ERE.

$ echo '<FQDN>Compname.dom.domain.com</FQDN>' | grep -Po '(?<=>)[^<]+'
Compname.dom.domain.com

The -P option will work in most Linux environments, but not in *BSD or OSX or Solaris, etc.

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You can do it like you want with grep :

grep -oP '<FQDN>\K[^<]+' FILE

Output:

Compname.dom.domain.com
Compname1.dom.domain.com
Compname2.dom.domain.com
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1  
How does this work? I see what it does, I just haven't seen a \K do this in a regex before! –  ghoti Oct 3 '12 at 20:57
    
Like wikipedia said : Since version 7.2, \K can be used in a pattern to reset the start of the current whole match. This provides a flexible alternative approach to look-behind assertions because the discarded part of the match (the part that precedes \K) need not be fixed in length. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perl_Compatible_Regular_Expressions –  sputnick Oct 3 '12 at 21:02
    
Ah, it wouldn't have occurred to me to look on Wikipedia for documentation for grep. :-) Thanks, that may come in handy. –  ghoti Oct 3 '12 at 21:50

Grep isn't what you are looking for. Try sed with a regular expression : http://unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/CGI/man-cgi?sed

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