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get nth line of string in python

Is there a way to get a specified line from a multiline string in Python? For example:

>>> someString = 'Hello\nthere\npeople\nof\nEarth'
>>> aNewString = someString.line(1)
>>> print aNewString
there

I'd like to make a simple "interpreter" style script, looping through every line of the file it's fed.

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1  
str.split and/or str.splitlines –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 3 '12 at 21:11
    
Actually, if you want to make a simple interpreter, you probably don't want to get a string full of newlines in the first place. Instead of script = scriptfile.read(); …; for line in lines: just do for line in scriptfile:. –  abarnert Oct 3 '12 at 21:18
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marked as duplicate by phant0m, inspectorG4dget, bstpierre, ecatmur, Jason Sturges Oct 5 '12 at 18:04

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
>>> someString = 'Hello\nthere\npeople\nof\nEarth'
>>> someList = someString.splitlines()
>>> aNewString = someList[1]
>>> print aNewString
there
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Cool. I'm embarrassed to say I didn't know about splitlines. Thanks. –  John Vinyard Oct 3 '12 at 21:12
2  
@JohnVinyard: Then I'm guessing you've never written code on Unix and then had to deal with bugs from Windows users? I first discovered it after writing code to remove a '\r' from the end of each line if present… and then code to deal with a rare case where there was a real '\r' in just one line from a Unix text file… and… –  abarnert Oct 3 '12 at 21:16
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Split the string on newlines:

>>> someString = 'Hello\nthere\npeople\nof\nEarth'
>>> someString.split('\n')
['Hello', 'there', 'people', 'of', 'Earth']
>>> someString.split('\n')[1]
'there'
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Remember that we can split strings to form lists. In this case, you want to split using the newline character \n as your delimiter, so something like this:

someString = 'Hello\nthere\npeople\nof\nEarth'
print someString.split('\n')[lineindex]

There is also a splitlines function that uses universal newlines as delimiters:

someString = 'Hello\nthere\npeople\nof\nEarth'
print someString.splitlines()[lineindex]
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2  
splitlines does not automatically use '\n' as a delimiter; it uses universal newlines. That's the whole point of using it instead. –  abarnert Oct 3 '12 at 21:16
    
Thanks for the tip - edited. –  arshajii Oct 3 '12 at 21:17
    
@abarnert so it will work with any encoding on any platform? –  tkbx Oct 3 '12 at 21:39
    
Line endings are a different issue from encodings. It will work with Unix (\n), DOS/Windows (\r\n), or classic Mac (\r) line endings, using the exact same magic the interpreter uses everywhere else it deals with them. If the files are in UTF-16 or EBCDIC or something, it won't help; for that you have to use a codec (or just somestring = somebytes.decode('UTF-16'), and then you can deal with the line splitting. –  abarnert Oct 6 '12 at 3:24
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In [109]: someString = 'Hello\nthere\npeople\nof\nEarth'

In [110]: someString.split("\n")[1]
Out[110]: 'there'

In [111]: lines=someString.split("\n")

In [112]: lines
Out[112]: ['Hello', 'there', 'people', 'of', 'Earth']
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