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Let's say I have the following structure:

abstract class Hand {}

class Rock extends Hand {}
class Paper extends Hand {}
class Scissors extends Hand {}

The goal is to make a function (or a method) Hand::compareHands(Hand $hand1, Hand $hand2), which would return the winning hand in a rock-paper-scissors match.

That would be very easy with a bunch of ifs, but the point is to have a more robust structure, that's relying on polymorphism rather than on procedural code.

P.S. this is done in actual production code, if someone is asking. This isn't some sort of challenge or homework. (It's not really rock-paper-scissors, but you get the point).

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The instances of Hand do not compare themselves. That's why we have Brains. –  tereško Oct 4 '12 at 11:40
    
@tereko: Interesting, have a solution involving Brain? –  Second Rikudo Oct 4 '12 at 11:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The sole nature of your hand is that it is beating one single other one.

Then you want to not repeat the code while having one concrete type per hand-form, so you need to parametrize. Depending on the level of freedom you can allow, this can be as simple as a protected member:

abstract class Hand {

    protected $beats;

    final public function beats(Hand $opponent) {

        return $opponent instanceof $this->beats;
    }
}

class Rock extends Hand {

    protected beats = 'Scissors';
}

class Paper extends Hand {

    protected beats = 'Rock';
}

class Scissors extends Hand {

    protected beats = 'Paper';
}

I think this is the standard template method pattern here, in a very simple form.

Compare this with Lusitanian's answer who should get the credits for the actual code, I just have re-sorted it a little bit. But only a very little.

Additionally I need to give credits to @Leigh for the far better function and parameter naming. This should reduce the need of comments.

The second alternative that Lusistanian suggests can be represented with the strategy pattern. It is also somewhat straight forward:

class EvaluateHands
{
    private $rules;

    public function __construct(array $rules)
    {
        $this->rules = $rules;
    }

    public function compareHands(Hand $hand1, Hand $hand2)
    {
        return $this->rules[get_class($hand1)] === get_class($hand2) ? $hand1 : $hand2;
    }
}

new EvaluateHands(
    array(
        'Rock' => 'Scissors',
        'Paper' => 'Rock',
        'Scissor' => 'Paper'
    )
);

The comparison between two hands has been fully encapsulated into the EvaluateHands type which is even configureable (if the rules of the game change), while the hands would stay the same:

abstract class Hand {}

class Rock extends Hand {}

class Paper extends Hand {}

class Scissors extends Hand {}

Credits for this code go to gordon (next to Lusistanian).

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Super beautiful. I think the only way I could make you down is lack of comments but what a very pretty solution. –  John Ballinger Oct 4 '12 at 11:54
    
@JohnBallinger: Please share where you miss the one or other comment, I'm happy to add those. –  hakre Oct 4 '12 at 11:55
    
+1, as it's quite clear and not an ivory-tower one. As a sidenote, perhaps it'd be wise to show different results for wins, draws and defeats, which checking both $hand instanceof $this->beats and $this instanceof $hand->beats. –  raina77ow Oct 4 '12 at 11:58
2  
ah okay, true, one could document the logic here (esp. return value of compareHand). however I think it is more important to show how to use the abstract function and the protected member to get this to work. The concrete algorithm is not that important (as OP wrote in question). compareHand is bool and tell whether the hand compared to (the parameter) is being beaten. –  hakre Oct 4 '12 at 12:02
    
I changed that now, the wording should be more clear, thanks @Leigh –  hakre Oct 4 '12 at 12:10

How about this?

class Scissors extends Hand implements Beats<Paper> {}

where Beats<> is a generic interface whose signature looks like:

interface Beats<Hand> {}
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I'm not programming in Java (the above is pseudo code) the actual code is PHP. Though this does seem interesting, could you elaborate on that? –  Second Rikudo Oct 3 '12 at 21:32
1  
Oh, ok. I know PHP added traits recently, which are like interfaces, but I don't know if it can do generics. Since you asked about OOP generically, and not PHP specifically, I'll leave this as it is. –  Chris Laplante Oct 3 '12 at 21:33
1  
+1, certainly the right idea –  Lusitanian Oct 3 '12 at 22:00
    
I appreciate the community's opinion on this, but I don't have generic interfaces in PHP :( (plus I don't know how to use them in Java). So while it may be good, It's not quite the answer I'm looking for :) –  Second Rikudo Oct 4 '12 at 6:52

From PHP chat

OOP-style

<?php
interface Hand {
    function beats(Hand $hand);
}

class Rock implements Hand {
    public function beats(Hand $hand) {
        return $hand instanceof Scissors;
    }
}
class Paper implements Hand {
    public function beats(Hand $hand) {
        return $hand instanceof Rock;
    }
}

class Scissors implements Hand {
    public function beats(Hand $hand) {
        return $hand instanceof Paper;
    }
}

Simple function

<?php
const PAPER = 1;
const ROCK = 2;
const SCISSORS = 3;

function whichHandWon($hand1, $hand2) {
    $winners = [PAPER => ROCK, ROCK => SCISSORS, SCISSORS => PAPER];
    return intval($winners[$hand1] !== $hand2) + 1;
}
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Looks interesting, but I would like to try and avoid repeating the code over and over. –  Second Rikudo Oct 3 '12 at 21:34

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