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I have a event class that i am using to insert/update data into my database. Is there a way that i can create the public variables from my db_fields array so that i am not having to duplicate the data?

This is my current structure which works...

class event{
    protected static $table_name='tName';
    protected static $db_fields = array('field1','field2','field3','field4','field5');

    public $field1;
    public $field2;
    public $field3;
    public $field4;
    public $field5;
}

I would like to have something like this..

class event{
    protected static $table_name='tName';
    protected static $db_fields = array('field1','field2','field3','field4','field5');

    function __construct() {
        create_public_vars_here($db_fields);
    }

}

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try the following:

class event{

    protected static $table_name='tName';
    protected static $db_fields = array('field1','field2','field3','field4','field5');

    function __construct() {
        foreach (self::$db_fields as $var) {
            $this->$var = $whateverDefaultValue;
        }
        // After the foreach loop, you'll have a bunch of properties of this object with the variable names being the string values of the $db_fiels.
        // For example, you'll have $field1, $field2, etc and they will be loaded with the value $whateverDefaultValue (probably want to set it to null).
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice. Is there a way to explicitly declare the variable "public" instead of relying on the default behavior or non-declared variables being public? –  L0j1k Oct 3 '12 at 21:54
    
@L0j1k I believe it's possible, but I haven't really done that before. Someone has said that Reflection can do this: php.net/manual/en/reflectionproperty.setaccessible.php Check out this post as well: stackoverflow.com/questions/5274348/… –  Stegrex Oct 3 '12 at 21:58
    
So if I use this the variables are public by default without declaring them so? –  user1718435 Oct 3 '12 at 22:00
1  
I'm shocked (and kind of disturbed) that PHP lets you do that. +1 for bringing it to my attention. –  KRyan Oct 3 '12 at 22:01
1  
The reason for that is because relying on this kind of implicit functionality makes some errors very, very hard to find. You are obfuscating your code by doing it, so it's best not to. –  L0j1k Oct 3 '12 at 22:04

You can use magic setters / getters:

class event{

    protected static $table_name='tName';
    protected static $db_fields = array('field1','field2','field3','field4','field5');

    public function __get($key)
    {

        if(!in_array($key, static::$db_fields))
            throw new Exception( $key . " doesn't exist.");

        return $this -> $key;

    }

    public function __set($key, $value)
    {

        if(!in_array($key, static::$db_fields))
            throw new Exception( $key . " doesn't exist.");

        $this -> $key = $value;

    }   

}

This way you are sure not to hit values outside your list:

$event -> field1 = 'hello';  // --> OK
$event -> field17 = 'hello'; // --> Exception: field17 doesn't exist

echo $event -> field1;  // --> OK
echo $event -> field17; // --> Exception: field17 doesn't exist

As for having an explicit public variable declaration in your code, you have no need as long as you don't have to iterate over your objects - but in this case you'd implement Iterator interface based on your static field.

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Use mutators:

class event{
  protected static $table_name='tName';
  protected static $db_fields = array('field1','field2','field3','field4','field5');

  function getVars($var) {
    if(!in_arrary($this->db_fields[$var])) {
      return false;
    } else {
      return $this->db_fields[$var];
    }
  }
}

And then you can access it like this:

$eventObject->getVars('field3');

Or, if you don't create an object out of the class:

event::getVars('field3');

EDIT: In the spirit of complicating things so that you don't have a bounds violation, code added.

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1  
Why not just use __get()? –  KRyan Oct 3 '12 at 21:54
    
I dunno. That's one way to do it. I just wrote up my answer like this. :P +1 –  L0j1k Oct 3 '12 at 21:55

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