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I use the following code

Matrix operator * (const Matrix & obj)
{
    Matrix m = Matrix();

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
        {
            m[i][j] = 0;

            for (int k = 0; k < 4; k++)
                m[i][j] += _data[i][k] * obj._data[k][j];
        }

    return m;
}

like this

v1 = m_proj * m_view * m_object * v1;

But I guess it is very unoptimized since I presume the new Matrix I create inside the operator is being copied around like crazy. If I do this though

Matrix & operator * (const Matrix & obj)
{
    Matrix m = Matrix();

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
        {
            m[i][j] = 0;

            for (int k = 0; k < 4; k++)
                m[i][j] += _data[i][k] * obj._data[k][j];
        }

    return m;
}

Change the return type of the operator to a reference to Matrix the whole code stops working altogether (it compiles, just the matrices are not being multiplied as they should).

If I change it to

Matrix & operator * (const Matrix & obj)
{
    Matrix & m = * new Matrix();

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
        {
            m[i][j] = 0;

            for (int k = 0; k < 4; k++)
                m[i][j] += _data[i][k] * obj._data[k][j];
        }

    return m;
}

Now it works but I have a bad memory leak.

So how do I solve this problem? Is there an elegant solution?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
C++11 or C++03? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 3 '12 at 22:38
    
Why is there a clear-up of m[i][j] in the second for loop? I haven't used c++ in awhile, so what does your code actually do? –  David D. Oct 3 '12 at 22:40
1  
Is "Matrix m = Matrix();" your way of saying "Matrix m;" but with vigor..? –  WhozCraig Oct 3 '12 at 22:44
    
@DavidD.You are right, actually my constructor initializes the elements to the identity, so I actually don't need that. –  Martin Marinov Oct 3 '12 at 22:47
1  
@MartinMarinov David Rodríguez - dribeas' answer should be the accepted one. I'm keeping mine for future reference, but his is much more comprehensive. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 3 '12 at 22:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your function is creating a new object, and it should return the object by value.

You cannot return references to a local variable, and returning references to dynamically allocated memory has multiple issues: it solves nothing (does not reduce the number of objects created by the expression, and makes each object more expensive to create due to the dynamic allocation) and adds memory leaks.

Without the definition of the class Matrix it is not clear whether the memory is handled in an array or it is dynamically allocated. If it is dynamically allocated and you have a C++11 compiler, you can implement move construction and move assignment and the cost of all those copies will go away.

In C++03 (and also in C++11) you can implement operator*= and manually handle the objects that get created (assuming that you can do this in place efficiently):

//v1 = m_proj * m_view * m_object * v1;
Matrix tmp = m_proj;
tmp *= m_view;
tmp *= m_object;
tmp *= v1;
v1 = tmp;

This will create a single temporary and apply all the multiplications in place, reducing the number of copies.

At any rate, I would not spend too much time with this, as a 4x4 matrix is not that expensive to copy.

share|improve this answer

The second version - automatic storage variable returned by reference - is undefined behavior - don't do it.

The third version is bad and you shouldn't do it - avoid dynamic allocation when possible.

The first version shouldn't be that much slower than what you expect - assuming all optimizations are in place and your compiler supports RVO/NRVO (which it probably does).

Another alternative is returning a smart pointer - that way the object created inside the class isn't copied on return, but a managed pointer to it (which is easily a lot more efficient).

share|improve this answer
    
In the first version there will be 3 temporary values, no matter how the compiler optimizes the code. RVO will apply to the return of each operator*, but it will create one temporary for each execution of that operator (same thing for returning a smart pointer, which will incur the extra cost of dynamic allocation) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 3 '12 at 22:44

Your first case is the correct one. It might actually be efficient (for some definition of...), as the compiler is allowed to optimize the copy away (i.e. it may create the new object right were the result is supposed to go); this is called "return value optimization".

Your second solution is garbage; you are returning a reference to an object on the stack, which will be gone when the function returns. I wonder why it didn't even give you warning.

The third solution, as you have observed, leakes memory because nothing ever frees the "new"-ed objects. It is no more efficient than the first one if RVO kicks in, and actually less efficient since you get an additional 'dynamic memory allocation' overhead.

There just isn't a lot you can do about this, other than not using operator* at all to do your multiplications and find a more suitable API to multiply your matrices. Judging by the names you used, you can probably pull out some of the multiplications from your inner loop.

share|improve this answer

This question seems to be more about optimization than anything else.

So I don't understand why you are even using loops if you are so worried about the potential overhead of copying.

Make a matrix constructor that takes 16 arguments.

Then:

Matrix operator * (const Matrix & obj)
{
    return Matrix(
        _data[0][0]*_obj._data[0][0] + _data[0][1]*_obj._data[1][0] + _data[0][2]*_obj._data[2][0] + _data[0][3]*_obj._data[3][0], 
        _data[1][0]*_obj._data[0][0] + _data[1][1]*_obj._data[1][0] + _data[1][2]*_obj._data[2][0] + _data[1][3]*_obj._data[3][0], 
        _data[2][0]*_obj._data[0][0] + _data[2][1]*_obj._data[1][0] + _data[2][2]*_obj._data[2][0] + _data[2][3]*_obj._data[3][0], 
        // etc...
        );
}
share|improve this answer

For the sake of optimization, you could use 3-argument functions instead: void multiply(const Matrix& a, const Matrix& b, Matrix& result).

This way you can ensure you won't have unnecessary copies.

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