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I have difficulty understanding this piece of code:

Particularly this part:

     // check that the stuff we wrote has not changed
     if(n[k][0]!=(unsigned char)(n[k]+s[k]+k))
        printf("Error when checking first byte!\n");
     if(s[k]>1 && n[k][s[k]-1]!=(unsigned char)(n[k]-s[k]-k))
        printf("Error when checking last byte!\n");

The whole program tries to mimic the Windows' malloc and free function. It must be run on Windows.

Anyone can explain how those 2 ifs work?

Thanks.

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closed as too localized by Deanna, asawyer, Josh Caswell, Benjamin Pollack, the Tin Man Oct 4 '12 at 20:19

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Can you show a bit more code? How are n and s and k declared? I could guess but it'd be better if you added it :) –  peacemaker Oct 3 '12 at 22:46
    
Please explain more clearly what it is about the code that confuses you, and update the question title accordingly so that the question will be useful to others in the future. Otherwise, it may be closed for being Too Localized. –  Raymond Chen Oct 3 '12 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The code makes more sense with a bit more context.

// used to store pointers to allocated memory
unsigned char *n[NO_OF_POINTERS]; 

int s[5000]; // used to store sizes when testing

....

for(i=0;i<NO_OF_ITERATIONS;i++) {
   k=myrand()%NO_OF_POINTERS; // pick a pointer
   if(n[k]) { // if it was allocated then free it
      // check that the stuff we wrote has not changed
      if(n[k][0]!=(unsigned char)(n[k]+s[k]+k))
         printf("Error when checking first byte!\n");
      if(s[k]>1 && n[k][s[k]-1]!=(unsigned char)(n[k]-s[k]-k))
         printf("Error when checking last byte!\n");
      FREE(n[k]);
   }
   size=randomsize(); // pick a random size
             size=1;
   n[k]=(unsigned char *)MALLOC(size); // do the allocation
   s[k]=size; // remember the size
   n[k][0]=(unsigned char)(n[k]+s[k]+k);  // put some data in the first and
   if(size>1) n[k][size-1]=(unsigned char)(n[k]-s[k]-k); // last byte
}

The last two lines set the first and the last byte to values using a formula based on the pointer value (n[k]), the size of the allocation (s[k]), and the pointer index (k). There is no meaning to this formula, it's just a calculation of a value to be stored that will be different for different pointer allocations.

The if statements you highlighted check that the values of the first (n[k][0]) and last (n[k][s[k]-1]) bytes haven't changed before freeing the memory. The code is basically a test harness for the VirtualAlloc and VirtualFree functions.

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Thanks mate, I was trying to make sense out of that crazy function but now it turns out to be something absolutely mathematically nonsense, then the whole thing is now enlightened !!! –  Fukuzawa Yukio Oct 3 '12 at 23:03
1  
Let's hear it for verbosely named variables :) –  Deanna Oct 4 '12 at 8:25

n looks like a multi-dimensional array of unsigned char. The first line:

if(n[k][0]!=(unsigned char)(n[k]+s[k]+k))

is checking the first element in the sub array n[k] is not equal to the sum of (n[k]+s[k]+k) cast to an unsigned char

The second line:

if(s[k]>1 && n[k][s[k]-1]!=(unsigned char)(n[k]-s[k]-k))

seems to be checking if the kth element of the array s is greater than one AND (logical and) the element s[k]-1 in the sub array n[k] is not equal to the result of (n[k]-s[k]-k)

Overall, it's some pretty bad code and could do with some nicer variable names!

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Ahh I just noticed the link OP gave to ideone.com/pkhGL which gives this a bit more context. @AndrewCooper's answer is better –  peacemaker Oct 3 '12 at 22:55

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