Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I attempt to use a static method from within the body of the class, and define the static method using the built-instaticmethodfunction as a decorator, like this:

class Klass(object):

    @staticmethod  # use as decorator
    def _stat_func():
        return 42

    _ANS = _stat_func()  # call the staticmethod

    def method(self):
        ret = Klass._stat_func() + Klass._ANS
        return ret

I get the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):<br>
  File "call_staticmethod.py", line 1, in <module>
    class Klass(object): 
  File "call_staticmethod.py", line 7, in Klass
    _ANS = _stat_func() 
  TypeError: 'staticmethod' object is not callable

I understand why this is happening, and can work around it by manually converting_stat_func() into a staticmethod after its last use, like so:

class Klass(object):

    def _stat_func():
        return 42

    _ANS = _stat_func()  # use the non-staticmethod version

    _stat_func = staticmethod(_stat_func)  # convert function to a static method

    def method(self):
        ret = Klass._stat_func() + Klass._ANS
        return ret

So my question is:

Are there better, as in cleaner or more "Pythonic", ways to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
4  
If you're asking about Pythonicity, then the standard advice is not to use staticmethod at all. They are usually more useful as module-level functions, in which case your problem is not an issue. classmethod, on the other hand... –  Benjamin Hodgson Oct 3 '12 at 23:22
    
@poorsod: Yes, I'm aware of that alternative. However in the actual code where I encountered this issue, making the function a static method rather than putting it at module-level makes more sense than it does in the simple example used in my question. –  martineau Oct 3 '12 at 23:43
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

staticmethod objects apparently have a __func__ attribute storing the original raw function (makes sense that they had to). So this will work:

class Klass(object):

    @staticmethod  # use as decorator
    def stat_func():
        return 42

    _ANS = stat_func.__func__()  # call the staticmethod

    def method(self):
        ret = Klass.stat_func()
        return ret

As an aside, though I suspected that a staticmethod object had some sort of attribute storing the original function, I had no idea of the specifics. In the spirit of teaching someone to fish rather than giving them a fish, this is what I did to investigate and find that out (literally a C&P from my Python session):

>>> class Foo(object):
    @staticmethod
    def foo():
        return 3
    global z
    z = foo

>>> z
<staticmethod object at 0x0000000002E40558>
>>> Foo.foo
<function foo at 0x0000000002E3CBA8>
>>> dir(z)
['__class__', '__delattr__', '__doc__', '__format__', '__func__', '__get__', '__getattribute__', '__hash__', '__init__', '__new__', '__reduce__', '__reduce_ex__', '__repr__', '__setattr__', '__sizeof__', '__str__', '__subclasshook__']
>>> z.__func__
<function foo at 0x0000000002E3CBA8>

Similar sorts of digging in an interactive session (dir is very helpful) can often solve these sorts of question very quickly.

share|improve this answer
    
Good update...I was just about to ask how you knew this since I don't see it in the documentation -- which makes me a little nervous about using it because it might be an "implementation detail". –  martineau Oct 3 '12 at 23:31
    
After further reading I see that __func__ is just another name for im_func and was added to Py 2.6 for Python 3 forwards-compatibility. –  martineau Oct 4 '12 at 0:06
    
@martineau Not in this context. Bound and unbound method objects have an im_func attribute for getting the raw function, and the __func__ attribute of these method objects is the same as im_func. staticmethod objects do not have an im_func attribute (as shown by my dir posting above, and confirmed in an actual interpreter session). –  Ben Oct 4 '12 at 0:38
    
I see, so technically it is undocumented in this context. –  martineau Oct 4 '12 at 0:56
    
I'm going to accept your answer now because it still works in Python 2.7.4 and 3.3, so I'm less worried about it being undocumented. Thanks! –  martineau Apr 15 '13 at 21:45
add comment

What about this solution? It does not rely on knowledge of @staticmethod decorator implementation. Inner class StaticMethod plays as a container of static initialization functions.

class Klass(object):

    class StaticMethod:
        @staticmethod  # use as decorator
        def _stat_func():
            return 42

    _ANS = StaticMethod._stat_func()  # call the staticmethod

    def method(self):
        ret = self.StaticMethod._stat_func() + Klass._ANS
        return ret
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for creativity, but I'm no longer worried about using __func__ because it is now officially documented (see section Other Language Changes of the What's New in Python 2.7 and its reference to Issue 5982). Your solution is even more portable, since it would probably also work in Python versions before to 2.6 (when __func__ was first introduced as a synonym of im_func). –  martineau May 16 at 1:12
add comment

Could you use a classmethod instead?

class Klass(object):

  @classmethod  # use as decorator
  def stat_func(cls):
    return 42

  def method(self):
    ret = Klass.stat_func()
    return ret # 42
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't allow calls in the class body outside a method such as the _ANS = stat_func() statement. Error: TypeError: 'classmethod' object is not callable instead of 'staticmethod' is not callable. –  martineau Oct 4 '12 at 0:22
add comment

This is due to staticmethod being a descriptor and requires a class-level attribute fetch to exercise the descriptor protocol and get the true callable.

From the source code:

It can be called either on the class (e.g. C.f()) or on an instance (e.g. C().f()); the instance is ignored except for its class.

But not directly from inside the class while it is being defined.

But as one commenter mentioned, this is not really a "Pythonic" design at all. Just use a module level function instead.

share|improve this answer
    
As I said in my question, I understand why the original code didn't work. Can you explain (or provide a link to something that does) why it's considered unPythonic? –  martineau Oct 3 '12 at 23:48
    
The staticmethod requires the class object itself to work correctly. But if you call it from within the class at the class level the class isn't really fully defined at that point. So you can't reference it yet. It's ok to call the staticmethod from outside the class, after it's defined. But "Pythonic" is not actually well defined, much like aesthetics. I can tell you my own first impression of that code was not favorable. –  Keith Oct 3 '12 at 23:58
    
Impression of which version (or both)? And why, specifically? –  martineau Oct 4 '12 at 0:11
    
I can only guess at what your ultimate goal is, but it seems to me that you want a dynamic, class-level attribute. This looks like a job for metaclasses. But yet again there might be a simpler way, or another way to look at the design that eliminates and simplifies without sacrificing the functionality. –  Keith Oct 4 '12 at 3:23
    
No, what I want to do is actually pretty simple -- which is to factor out some common code and reuse it, both to create a private class attribute at class-creation time, and later on within one or more class methods. This common code has no use outside the class, so I naturally want it to be a part of it. Using a metaclass (or a class decorator) would work, but that seems like overkill for something that ought to be easy to do, IMHO. –  martineau Oct 4 '12 at 16:32
show 3 more comments

What about injecting the class attribute after the class definition?

class Klass(object):

    @staticmethod  # use as decorator
    def stat_func():
        return 42

    def method(self):
        ret = Klass.stat_func()
        return ret

Klass._ANS = Klass.stat_func()  # inject the class attribute with static method value
share|improve this answer
    
This is similar to my first attempts at a work around, but I would prefer something that was inside the class...partially because the attribute involved has a leading underscore and is private. –  martineau Oct 3 '12 at 23:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.