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I already know of include guards, but here are some issues i'd like to figure out:

Example 1

Foo.h

int SumOfNums(int i, int j);

Foo.cpp

#include "Foo.h"
int SumOfNums(int i, int j){
   return i+j;
}

main.cpp

#include "Foo.h"
#include "Foo.h"

int main(){
    SumOfNumbs(5,10);
}

This will compile and run ok.

Example 2

Foo.h

int SumOfNums(int i, int j);
int i;

Foo.cpp

#include "Foo.h"
int SumOfNums(int i, int j){
   return i+j;
}

main.cpp

#include "Foo.h"

int main(){
    SumOfNumbs(5,10);
}

Redefinition of 'i' according to compier.

Example 3

Foo.h

int SumOfNums(int i, int j);
enum FooBar{FOO, BAR};

Foo.cpp

#include "Foo.h"
int SumOfNums(int i, int j){
   return i+j;
}

main.cpp

#include "Foo.h"

int main(){
    SumOfNumbs(5,10);
}

This will compile and run ok.

Example 4

Foo.h

int SumOfNums(int i, int j);
enum FooBar{FOO, BAR};

Foo.cpp

#include "Foo.h"
int SumOfNums(int i, int j){
   return i+j;
}

main.cpp

#include "Foo.h"
#include "Foo.h"
int main(){
    SumOfNumbs(5,10);
}

Redefinition of FooBar according to compiler.

To sum it up:

Example 1 - Why can Foo.h be included twice in main.cpp, when there's no include guards?

Example 2 - How does the int variable differ from the function header?

Example 3 - Why doesn't the linker complain when there's one definition of FooBar in Foo.cpp and one in main.cpp?

Example 4 - What's the difference between this and Example 1?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ex1 - Why can Foo.h be included twice in main.cpp, when there's no include guards?

Because in that case, it only declares a function. You can have as many declarations as you want.

Ex2 - How does the int variable differ from the function header?

That's also a definition and thus breaks the one definition rule.

Ex3 - Why doesn't the linker complain when there's one definition of FooBar in Foo.cpp and one in main.cpp?

Defining types across translation units is fine.

Ex4 - What's the difference between this and Ex1 ?

You're defining the same type twice in the same translation unit - not permitted.

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What if I have a constant in the header file? Wouldn't that behave like example 2? –  Carlj901 Oct 4 '12 at 1:03
  1. Declaring a function more than once is not an error.

  2. The function declaration for SumOfNums only tells the compiler that SumOfNums exists somewhere (but not here). The definition of i allocates storage in the global area and gives it a name. You have two definitions of i, one in each .cpp file, because the header with the definition is included more than once.

  3. The linker never sees the enum FooBar. The values in the enumeration are used as constants by the compiler.

  4. This example contains a declaration for enum FooBar, while example 1 doesn't. The compiler only expects to see a declaration for a given enum once.

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I'm sure you know this, but your 1. implies declaring a variable more than once is an error. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 3 '12 at 23:30
1  
@LuchianGrigore: No it doesn't, my statement 1 says nothing about variables. –  Greg Hewgill Oct 3 '12 at 23:30
1  
Exactly, and it emphasizes "function". What's wrong with "Declaring more than once is not an error"? –  Luchian Grigore Oct 3 '12 at 23:31
  1. Because function declarations can be repeated, but type definitions etc cannot.
  2. You define the variable i in each translation unit that includes the header, but the 'One Definition Rule' means you can have only one definition for the variable in the program.
  3. The definition of enum FooBar is purely the type information; the header neither defines nor declares variables of that type. You get similar behaviour with standard headers like <iostream>.
  4. The difference here is that you try to repeat the type definition of enum FooBar (by including Foo.h twice) and type redefinition is not permitted and is a primary reason why you should use header guards.
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The general answer is that you can declare things multiple times but you can define it only once (it isn't entirely true, there are few things you can declare only once, e.g., default arguments on templates). When multiple definitions are seen in a translation unit the compiler complains, when multiple definitions of things are seen in different translation units and they can't be defined multiple times in different translation units, the linker complains. For example, types, templates, and inline functions can be defined once in each translation unit without problems. Normal functions can only be defined in one translation unit.

In you first example, you just declare a function in your header. You can declare functions as often as you want. You can only define them once, though.

Your second example includes a definition of the variable i. Each translation unit compiling this header will include a definition of i. When the linker tries to build things it will detect that there are two definitions of i and it will fail. Include guards won't prevent this problem because you they only work within one translation unit.

Your third examples just declares a function in the header and also defines an enum. Types can only be defined once in each translation unit but multiple translation units can all have a definition of a type. The reason is simple: A type doesn't create any code and doesn't allocate any space for variables.

Your forth example includes the header defining the enum twice, i.e., the translation unit sees a redefinition of a type and fails. This problem would have been caught if you had used include guards.

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Ex1 - It can, because it can. I.e., it's legal, there's nothing in the language that prevents you from including a header file more than once. If there were, include guards wouldn't be necessary in the first place. There's nothing in this Foo.h that's preventing it from being included twice. All it has is a function prototype, and you can include as many copies of a function prototype as you want, as long as they are all the same.

Ex2 - You'll get a duplicate symbol message from the linker, as you will have two global variables named i. But that's a linker thing, not a compiler thing. If you're actually getting a compiler error, I guess it may be because, in Foo.cpp, after including Foo.h, you have a global variable i. But, inside the body of SumOfNums, you are also using i as a function parameter. Thus, inside that function, you have no access to the global i. Not all c++ compilers will gripe about that, though. Some will just give you a warning and go on about their merry business of compiling.

Ex3 - Because FooBar is a type, not a variable. Linker symbols are only generated for global variables and for function implementations, (meaning functions with a body, not just a prototype). There are no linker symbols being generated just by including Foo.h, and thus, there's no linker problem.

Ex4 - The Foo.h in this example defines a type, whereas the one in example 1 does not. Thus, by including Foo.h twice in the same main.cpp file, you are injecting the same type definition twice. That's illegal. If you ask me why that's illegal for type definitions but legal for function prototypes, all I can tell you is that's how the language spec is written. There's probably a rationale behind it, but I don't know what it is.

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