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private Node back isn't used yet, and enqueue (which was push) and dequeue (which was pop) haven't really been modified except for renaming some things. Again, this was originally a stack but I'm trying to modify it into a queue. I've done non-linked list queues and stacks before with ints, but with objects and linked lists I'm sort of lost.

public class DogQueue 
{
    private Node front = null;
    private Node back = null;
    private Node element = null;
    private int counter = 0;

The above is just setting up variables.

  private class Node //This sets up the Linked List
                     //Data Structure with nodes.
  {
      private Dog doggy;
      private Node nextNode;
      private Node firstNode;

      Node(Dog newDog)
      {
          doggy = newDog;
      }    
  }

Node stuff which I don't quite understand is above.

  public void enqueue(Dog aDog) //This should enqueue
                                //an object of type Dog.
  {       
      Node dogNode = new Node(aDog);
      dogNode.nextNode = front;
      counter++;
      front = dogNode;
  }

The above here is unmodified from the push method, just renamed.

  public Dog dequeue()      //This should output
                            //the first entry in the list.
  {
      Dog firstDog = front.doggy;
      element = front.firstNode;
      counter--;
      return firstDog;
  }

The above here is where I'm having the most trouble- currently it behaves like pop (getting and removing the last entered element in the list).

  public boolean isFull()   //Checks to see if List is Full.
  {
      return ( counter == 5 );
  }

I set up the counter to just go up to 5 so I can debug isFull.

  public boolean isEmpty()  //Checks to see if List is empty
  {
      if ( counter == 0 )
        {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
  }

This just says if counter is zero, then isEmpty is true (otherwise false).

}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I suck at data structures but I believe your enqueue and dequeue are still behaving like pop and push. The front should point to the head of the queue and the tail one past the last valid object. So the tail should eventually point to null.. I think it should be something like this:

  public void enqueue(Dog aDog)
     {
         Node dogNode = new Node(aDog);

         counter++;
         if (front == null)
             front = back = dogNode;
         else
         {
             back.nextNode = dogNode;
             back = dogNode;

         }
     }
  public Node dequeue()      
  {
      if(front == null) return null;
      Dog firstDog = front ;
      front = front.nextNode;
      counter--;
      return firstDog;
  }
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You're right, I was assuming push behaved like enqueue but I was wrong. So yes, they are both behaving as they would in a stack. Edit: This code correctly dequeues but it returns an error when I try to dequeue again. Also, thanks so much for the help. –  instago Oct 3 '12 at 23:52
    
Yeah I think you have to check for null. I forgot about that. Will update answer. –  Lews Therin Oct 3 '12 at 23:56
    
@instago Let me know if it works. And np. –  Lews Therin Oct 3 '12 at 23:58
    
You're missing something in your return statement. Unfortunately I am so lost in linked lists that I am unable to fill it in. I will need to spend some time studying the code to figure out exactly what's happening. –  instago Oct 4 '12 at 0:00
    
return null :D I hope that works :) I hate data structures too :( –  Lews Therin Oct 4 '12 at 0:01

Here's the main issue. Queues are FIFO (first in, first out), and Stacks are LIFO (last in, first out). For a queue, the first element you enqueue is the first one you receive, and the most recent element you push onto a stack is the first one you receive.

To that end, let's examine your code a bit.

  public void enqueue(Dog aDog) { //This should enqueue an object of type Dog.
      Node dogNode = new Node(aDog);
      dogNode.nextNode = front;
      counter++;
      front = dogNode;
  }

You're setting the next node of your new dog element to the front. You would have to go to the end of your queue, set your most recent node to be the new node, and the new node to be null. Using your code, it would look something like this:

public void enqueue(Dog aDog) {
    if(front == null) {
        front = new Node(aDog);
        back = front; // back will move later
    } else {
        Node tmp = new Node(aDog);
        tmp.setFirstNode(back);
        back.setNextNode(tmp);
        back = tmp;
    }
}

  public Dog dequeue() {      //This should output the first entry in the list.
      Dog firstDog = front.doggy;
      element = front.firstNode;
      counter--;
      return firstDog;
  }

At least, this does actually show the first thing in the queue. But it doesn't actually move the head pointer! Using your code, to do that, it would look something like this:

public Dog dequeue() {
    if(head == null) {
        return null;
    } else {
        Dog tmp = front.getDoggy()
        front = front.getNextNode(); //move the front to point to the next location
        front.getFirstNode().setNextNode(null); //sever the link to the first element 
        front.setFirstNode(null); //sever the link to the first element
        return tmp;
    }
}
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Thanks so much for the help, Makoto. For my first post, StackOverflow is being very generous. Thanks again. I will try out your code and return. –  instago Oct 4 '12 at 0:06
    
I need to define the methods getNextNode, get firstNode, setFirstNode, and setNextNode in Node, correct? –  instago Oct 4 '12 at 0:14
    
@instago: Yes, you will have to define the helper methods I've used. They follow the conventions of getters and setters used in the industry. –  Makoto Oct 4 '12 at 1:54

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