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I am not sure if the && operator works in regular expressions. What I am trying to do is match a line such that it starts with a number and has the letter 'a' AND the next line starts with a number and has the letter 'b' AND the next line... letter 'c'. This abc sequence will be used as a unique identifier to start reading the file.

Here is what I am sort of going for in awk.

/(^[0-9]+ .*a)&&\n(^[0-9]+ .*b)&&\n(^[0-9]+ .*c) {
print $0
}

Just one of these regex works like (^[0-9]+ .*a), but I am not sure how to string them together with AND THE NEXT LINE IS THIS.

My file would be like:

JUNK UP HERE NOT STARTING WITH NUMBER
1     a           0.110     0.069          
2     a           0.062     0.088          
3     a           0.062     0.121          
4     b           0.062     0.121          
5     c           0.032     0.100         
6     d           0.032     0.100          
7     e           0.032     0.100   

And what I want is:

3     a           0.062     0.121          
4     b           0.062     0.121          
5     c           0.032     0.100         
6     d           0.032     0.100          
7     e           0.032     0.100 
share|improve this question
    
For your case, because your "clauses" (the three conditions you want to AND together) don't overlap, you don't really need any operator at all, just "eat up" the rest of the line the way @m.buettner suggests. In cases where your conditions do overlap, like if you wanted to check that a line contained a symbol AND a number (but you don't know the order), then you would use what are called "lookahead assertions" to achieve this kind of matching. –  Andrew Cheong Oct 4 '12 at 1:14
    
Only lookahead assertion I know is the next() function in python. I attempted it in an answer below. –  chimpsarehungry Oct 4 '12 at 16:56
    
I'm not familiar with Python but I was talking about the lookahead and lookbehind constructs, which I do know Python supports: regular-expressions.info/lookaround.html. –  Andrew Cheong Oct 4 '12 at 16:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

[Update based on clarification.]

One high order bit is that Awk is a line-oriented language, so you won't actually be able to do a normal pattern match to span lines. The usual way to do something like this is to match each line separately, and have a later clause / statement figure out if all the right pieces have been matched.

What I'm doing here is looking for an a in the second field on one line, a b in the second field on another line, and a c in the second field on a third line. In the first two cases, I stash away the contents of the line as well as what line number it occurred on. When the third line is matched and we haven't yet found the whole sequence, I go back and check to see if the other two lines are present and with acceptable line numbers. If all's good, I print out the buffered previous lines and set a flag indicating that everything else should print.

Here's the script:

$2 == "a" { a = $0; aLine = NR; }
$2 == "b" { b = $0; bLine = NR; }
$2 == "c" && !keepPrinting {
    if ((bLine == (NR - 1)) && (aLine == (NR - 2))) {
        print a;
        print b;
        keepPrinting = 1;
    }
}
keepPrinting { print; }

And here's a file I tested it with:

JUNK UP HERE NOT STARTING WITH NUMBER
1     a           0.110     0.069
2     a           0.062     0.088
3     a           0.062     0.121
4     b           0.062     0.121
5     c           0.032     0.100
6     d           0.032     0.100
7     e           0.032     0.100
8     a           0.099     0.121
9     b           0.098     0.121
10    c           0.097     0.100
11    x           0.000     0.200

Here's what I get when I run it:

$ awk -f blort.awk blort.txt
3     a           0.062     0.121
4     b           0.062     0.121
5     c           0.032     0.100
6     d           0.032     0.100
7     e           0.032     0.100
8     a           0.099     0.121
9     b           0.098     0.121
10    c           0.097     0.100
11    x           0.000     0.200
share|improve this answer
    
That is similar to what I want. I should have mentioned that abc will be a unique sequence in my file. I'll be using it as a starting point to read. So the output I would like from your test file is the lines with a,b,c,d,e,a,b,c,x –  chimpsarehungry Oct 4 '12 at 14:46
    
I updated my answer based on your comments. The state machine solution you posted is interesting from an academic perspective, but perhaps something like this one is more practical? –  danfuzz Oct 4 '12 at 19:10
    
Thanks danfuzz. And easier for me to explain the script to my boss than the state machine. All I did was add {if ((keepPrinting > 0) && (++keepPrinting <= 50)) print $0} to get the number of lines I want after matching. –  chimpsarehungry Oct 4 '12 at 21:30

No it doesn't work. You could try something like this:

/(^[0-9]+.*a[^\n]*)\n([0-9]+.*b[^\n]*)\n([0-9]+.*c[^\n]*)/

And repeat that for as many letters as you need.

The [^\n]* will match as much non-linebreak characters in a row as possible (so up to the linebreak).

share|improve this answer
    
No that did not. Thanks for telling me that though –  chimpsarehungry Oct 3 '12 at 23:52
    
What do you get instead? –  Martin Büttner Oct 3 '12 at 23:52
    
nothing at all. –  chimpsarehungry Oct 3 '12 at 23:52
    
just for the fun of it, try replacing [^\n] with a . in all three instances –  Martin Büttner Oct 3 '12 at 23:55
    
no I meant delete the [^\n] and just use . ... if that doesn't do it, unfortunately, I'm out of ideas for today –  Martin Büttner Oct 4 '12 at 0:00

I am trying to do this in python. By making an iterator out of the lines, and trying to match the next couple lines with next().

lines = iter([line for line in open("FILE").readlines() if re.match(r'^([0-9])',line)])

for line in lines:
    count = 50
    if line.find('a'):
        if next(lines).find('b'):
            if next(lines).find('c'):
                while count > 0:
                    print line
                    count -=1

But it is just not working right. Ideally, I would find that match and print the next 50 lines starting at that 'a'. Maybe I need to implement some sort of state machine.

share|improve this answer

A friend wrote this awk program for me. It is a state machine. And it works.

#!/usr/bin/awk -f

BEGIN {
    # We start out in the "idle" state.
    state = "idle"
}

/^[0-9]+[[:space:]]+q/ {
    # Everytime we encounter a "# q" we either print it or go to the
    # "q_found" state.
    if (state != "printing") {
        state = "q_found"
        line_q = $0
    }
}

/^[0-9]+[[:space:]]+r/ {
    # If we are in the q_found state and "# r" immediate follows,
    # advance to the r_found state.  Else, return to "idle" and 
    # wait for the "# q" to start us off.
    if (state == "q_found") {
        state = "r_found"
        line_r = $0
    } else if (state != "printing") {
        state = "idle"
    }
}

/^[0-9]+[[:space:]]+l/ {
    # If we are in the r_found state and "# l" immediate follows,
    # advance to the l_found state.  Else, return to "idle" and 
    # wait for the "# q" to start us off.
    if (state == "r_found") {
        state = "l_found"
        line_l = $0
    } else if (state != "printing") {
        state = "idle"
    }
}

/^[0-9]+[[:space:]]+i/ {
    # If we are in the l_found state and "# i" immediate follows,
    # we're ready to start printing.  First, display the lines we
    # squirrelled away then move to the "printing" state.  Else,
    # go to "idle" and wait for the "# q" to start us off.
    if (state == "l_found") {
        state = "printing"
        print line_q
        print line_r
        print line_l
        line = 0
    } else if (state != "printing") {
        state = "idle"
    }
}

/^[0-9]+[[:space:]]+/ {
    # If in state "printing", print 50 lines then stop printing
    if (state == "printing") {
        if (++line < 48) print
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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