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I've found the following code does not work because the while loop steals the lock indefinitely:

public void run()
{
    while(true)
    {
        synchronized(run)
        {
            if (!run) break;
            [code]
        }
    }
}

public void stopRunning()
{
    synchronized(run)
    {
        run = false;
    }
}

My goal is to ensure that I don't return from a stopRunning() command until I know that my run() function is no longer actually running. I'm trying to prevent the run function from continuing to reference other things that I'm in the process of destroying. My first thought then is to add a line of code such as Thread.sleep(100) prior to synchronized(run) in order to ensure that it releases the lock. Is this the recommended practice or am I overlooking something [stupid/obvious]?

Thanks!

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I do not see anything tipping me off. Did you have something specific in mind that you thought I might see? –  CodeMonkey Oct 4 '12 at 0:06
    
Perhaps I'm incorrect on this, but because you are using your run variable in a read-only situation, you shouldn't have to worry about using synchronize. –  Nicholas Roge Oct 4 '12 at 0:10
    
Provided that you mark the condition variable as volatile, that's correct -- you won't need synchronize. But run() might take a little while to realize that the condition variable's value has changed, and it will keep accessing things that are being destroyed by the other thread. The thread calling stopRunning() needs to wait for the run() thread to finish. –  acj Oct 4 '12 at 0:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you just need stopRunning() to block until run() finishes doing stuff, you could just use a CountDownLatch set to 1. Call it stoppedSignal or something, and in run() you can call stoppedSignal.countDown() when it is finished. In stopRunning you can then set your condition for run() to finish and then call stoppedSignal.await(). It won't proceed until run() "releases" the latch by counting down. This is just one way to do it that would be a bit neater. All the synchronized block stuff that be got rid of.

Beware of the "synchronized" keyword - it's a very blunt and old tool. There are some wonderful things in the concurrency package that fulfil specific purposes much more neatly. "Concurrency In Practice" is a fantastic book on it.

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1  
A binary semaphore would work, too, since we don't know how much work run() will be doing. The condition variable will need to be marked as "volatile" so that writes to it are guaranteed to be visible to the thread that's executing run(). –  acj Oct 4 '12 at 0:31
    
I guess I was stuck on utilizing synchronized when there are definitely advantages to utilizing a more common "semaphore" approach. The CountDownLatch appears to do the trick. Thanks! –  CodeMonkey Oct 4 '12 at 1:02

Would something like this suffice?

public void run()
{
    while(run)
    {
        [code]
    }

   onRunStopped();
}

public void stopRunning()
{
    run = false;
}

public void onRunStopped()
{
    // Cleanup
}
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while synchronized(run) will lock run, you can use run.wait() to freeze the thread run() is executed in. in another thread, use run.notify() or run.notifyAll() to get run() to continue.

synchronized is used to sync between threads. use it only if there is a potential race condition between 2 or more of them.

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I like the notify() and wait() idea as I think the general "semaphore" concept will work the best for my application. I wasn't aware that I could treat an object as a semaphore just like with the synchronized. Apparently there is one problem though: my wait() is not guaranteed to be called prior to the notify() in all circumstances and this causes a fatal error. Do I just need a real semaphore then? –  CodeMonkey Oct 4 '12 at 0:50

Ensure the 'run' object is the same from both point in the code.

The while loop should be synchronizing to the same object as the stopRunning() method.

The while loop is not hogging the lock, it is more likely that the two pieces of code could be referencing a different object. But I cannot tell because the run object is not shown in the code.

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There are probably more elegant solutions, but I believe you could solve it with the changes bellow:

private boolean lock;

public void run() 
{ 
    while(true) 
    { 
        synchronized(lock) 
        { 
            if (!run) break; 
            [code] 
        } 
    } 
} 

public void stopRunning() 
{ 
    run = false; 
    synchronized(lock){ } 
} 
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