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I'm trying to write productions ( LL ) for the following code

a[i].b[a[p]].id.xyz.a[c].o = i;

Using ASTView in Eclipse, the productions are like

FieldAccess -> Exp NAME
Exp -> FieldAccess
FieldAccess -> ArrayAccess NAME
ArrayAccess -> ArrayAccess Exp
ArrayAccess -> FieldAccess 
Exp -> FieldAccess
.....

How can I define the above in Antlr? They are left recursive and as far as I know JAVA is LL.

share|improve this question
    
After you can parse these, what do you intend to do? –  Ira Baxter Nov 17 '12 at 1:17
    
@IraBaxter - static analysis –  questions Nov 27 '12 at 3:45
    
You need lots more than parsing to do that. See my essay on Life After Parsing: semdesigns.com/Products/DMS/LifeAfterParsing.html –  Ira Baxter Nov 27 '12 at 4:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's not possible to create an ANTLR v3 grammar for the rules:

FieldAccess -> Exp NAME
Exp         -> FieldAccess

ANTLR v4 can handle left recursion, but only direct left recursive rules:

Exp -> Exp '*' Exp
     | Exp '/' Exp
     | Exp '+' Exp
     ...
     | Name
     ...

(pseudo grammar syntax!)

but v4 is also not able to cope with your indirect left recursive rules:

FieldAccess -> Exp NAME
Exp         -> FieldAccess

I'm pretty sure you can make ANTLR create an AST just as Eclipse does using some fancy AST rewrite rules, but then you'll have edit your question and "draw" (or post a picture) of the desired AST for the input a[i].b[a[p].x].id.xyz.a[c].o = i;, and I might have a stab at it.

EDIT

Here's a small demo of how to parse your example input in a similar AST as you posted:

grammar T;

options {
  output=AST;
}

tokens {
  ASSIGN;
  IND;
  FA;
}

parse
 : assign EOF -> assign
 ;

assign
 : lookup '=' expr ';' -> ^(ASSIGN lookup expr)
 ;

expr
 : lookup
 ;

lookup
 : (NAME -> NAME) ( array_index  -> ^(IND $lookup array_index)
                  | field_access -> ^(FA $lookup field_access)
                  )*
 ;

array_index
 : '[' expr ']' -> expr
 ;

field_access
 : '.' NAME -> NAME
 ;

NAME  : 'a'..'z'+;
SPACE : ' ' {skip();};

WHen I debug the parser in ANTLRWorks with the input a[i].b[a[p].x].id.xyz.a[c].o = i;, the following AST is being generated:

enter image description here

EDIT

The rule:

lookup
 : (NAME -> NAME) ( array_index  -> ^(IND $lookup array_index)
                  | field_access -> ^(FA $lookup field_access)
                  )*
 ;

is nothing more than this:

lookup
 : NAME ( array_index^
        | field_access^
        )*
 ;

except the first will, for the input "a[i].b", create an AST like this:

        FA
       /  \
     IND   B
     / \
    A   I

where the latter would create a "reversed" AST:

        FA
       /  \
      B   IND
          / \
         I   A

(of course, the FA and IND wouldn't be in the last AST because they're not in the array_index and field_access rules, but if you'd put them there, it would have that structure).

share|improve this answer
    
@questions, see my EDIT. –  Bart Kiers Oct 5 '12 at 19:30
    
@questions, it's just like any other (new) thing you learn: practice, practice & practice. :) –  Bart Kiers Oct 5 '12 at 21:42
    
@questions Terence's (creator of ANTLR) books are great, and Scott Stanchfield has some very nice video tutorials, all of them mentioned in this Q&A: stackoverflow.com/questions/278480/antlr-tutorials –  Bart Kiers Oct 5 '12 at 21:55
    
Thanks! I dont want to have extended discussion in comments, but can you please add in your answer a litte about lookup production. What does $lookup mean in two | cases? –  questions Oct 6 '12 at 0:07
    
@questions, I just saw you last comment: will edit my answer later today with an explanation of $lookup. –  Bart Kiers Oct 8 '12 at 10:20

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