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I'm accustomed to doing this:

use MyDb
go
create type table_list as table (name sysname)
go
create proc rebuild_indexes
    @ls table_list readonly
as
  [...]

but now I want to create the proc in master and use it in other databases:

use master
go
create type table_list as table (name sysname)
go
create proc sp_rebuild_indexes
    @ls table_list readonly
as
  [...]

...it builds fine but I can't use it!

use MyDb
go
declare @ls table_list

yields:

Msg 2715, Level 16, State 3, Line 1 Column, parameter, or variable #1: Cannot find data type table_list. Parameter or variable '@ls' has an invalid data type.

so I tried creating a synonym, which doesn't complain during creation but doesn't help:

create synonym table_list for master.dbo.table_list

thoughts anyone?

share|improve this question
    
Did you try referring to the data type as master..table_list? –  Vikdor Oct 4 '12 at 1:43
    
@Vikdor, I did but it doesn't compile –  ekkis Oct 4 '12 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

Table types declared in different databases, even if they share the same name and structure, are not treated as being the same by SQL Server:

create database DB1
go
use DB1
go
create type TT1 as table (ID int not null)
go
create procedure Echo
    @T TT1 readonly
as
    select * from @T
go
create database DB2
go
use DB2
go
create type TT1 as table (ID int not null)
go
declare @T TT1
insert into @T(ID) values (1)
exec DB1..Echo @T

Result:

(1 row(s) affected)
Msg 206, Level 16, State 2, Procedure Echo, Line 0
Operand type clash: TT1 is incompatible with TT1

So far as I'm aware, there is no way to declare a variable in a database using a table type definition from another database. (e.g. anywhere where you see a user defined table type can be used, it can only be named as <table type> or <schema>.<table type>. 3 or 4 part names are not allowed)

(The above is true for 2008 and 2012; obviously, future versions may do something to address this)


As a work-around, you can do it the "poor man's" way - have your master defined stored procedure work against a temp table, rather than a user defined table type:

use Master
go
create procedure sp_Echo
as
    select DB_NAME(),* from #t
go
create database DB1
go
use DB1
go
create table #t (ID int not null)
insert into #t (ID) values (1),(2)
exec sp_Echo

Results:

------------- -----------
DB1           1
DB1           2
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - yeah, I can pass an XML object too, I guess. the sad thing is that synonyms don't work... the whole point of the synonym is that you can make references to foreign objects seem local. oh well. –  ekkis Oct 4 '12 at 18:04

AFAIK, user defined types can't be used outside the context of the database they were created in.

You may have to create the UDT in each database, but leave the sProc in master.

Is there a specific reason you're using the sp_ naming convention?

Peet

share|improve this answer
2  
Even if you declare two structurally identical table types in two databases, with the same name, you can't pass an instance of one from one database to the other. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 4 '12 at 6:00
    
I'm not sure if this means the same thing... "if the same user-defined type is registered and can be accessed in two databases, you can convert a user-defined type value from one database for use in another database" msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178069(v=sql.105).aspx –  RubbaChikin Oct 4 '12 at 6:04
    
Only pages I can find that quote on are talking about CLR UDTs, not table types. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 4 '12 at 6:07
    
Yeah... I was hoping it applied to table types too... I repro'd the behaviour that ekkis provided. I then added the table type to MyDB and didn't get an error. Now I'm wondering what exactly was passed into the sProc... –  RubbaChikin Oct 4 '12 at 6:13
    
OK. I tried it again, this time with feeling. Damien is right, it doesn't work. –  RubbaChikin Oct 4 '12 at 6:21

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