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I'm playing around with TypeScript, and I've got a couple functional mixins, Eventable and Settable, that I'd like to mixin to a Model class (pretend it's something like a Backbone.js model):

function asSettable() {
  this.get = function(key: string) {
    return this[key];
  };
  this.set = function(key: string, value) {
    this[key] = value;
    return this;
  };
}

function asEventable() {
  this.on = function(name: string, callback) {
    this._events = this._events || {};
    this._events[name] = callback;
  };
  this.trigger = function(name: string) {
    this._events[name].call(this);
  }
}

class Model {
  constructor (properties = {}) {
  };
}

asSettable.call(Model.prototype);
asEventable.call(Model.prototype);

The code above works fine, but would not compile if I tried to use one of the mixed-in methods like (new Model()).set('foo', 'bar').

I can work around this by

  1. adding interface declarations for the mixins
  2. declaring dummy get/set/on/trigger methods in the Model declaration

Is there a clean way around the dummy declarations?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here's one way to approach mixins using interfaces and a static create() method. Interfaces support multiple inheritance so that prevents you from having to redefine the interfaces for your mixins and the static create() method takes care of giving you back an instance of Model() as an IModel (the <any> cast is needed to supress a compiler warning.) You'll need to duplicate all of your member definitions for Model on IModel which sucks but it seems like the cleanest way to achieve what you want in the current version of TypeScript.

edit: I've identified a slightly simpler approach to supporting mixins and have even created a helper class for defining them. Details can be found over here.

function asSettable() {
  this.get = function(key: string) {
    return this[key];
  };
  this.set = function(key: string, value) {
    this[key] = value;
    return this;
  };
}

function asEventable() {
  this.on = function(name: string, callback) {
    this._events = this._events || {};
    this._events[name] = callback;
  };
  this.trigger = function(name: string) {
    this._events[name].call(this);
  }
}

class Model {
  constructor (properties = {}) {
  };

  static create(): IModel {
      return <any>new Model();
  }
}

asSettable.call(Model.prototype);
asEventable.call(Model.prototype);

interface ISettable {
    get(key: string);
    set(key: string, value);
}

interface IEvents {
    on(name: string, callback);
    trigger(name: string);
}

interface IModel extends ISettable, IEvents {
}


var x = Model.create();
x.set('foo', 'bar');
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3  
Was about to post this. TypeScript really should be extended to support mixins of classes, since a lot of JS-libraries currently use that (For example Backbone.js). –  Sheeo Oct 4 '12 at 5:49
2  
+1 to the need for partial classes and/or mixins –  Steven Ickman Oct 4 '12 at 5:51

The cleanest way to do it, althought it still requires double type declarations, is to define the mixin as a module:

module Mixin {
    export function on(test) {
        alert(test);
    }
};

class TestMixin implements Mixin {
    on: (test) => void;
};


var mixed = _.extend(new TestMixin(), Mixin); // Or manually copy properties
mixed.on("hi");

An alternative to using interfaces is to hack it with classes (Although because of multiple-inheritance, you'll need to create a common-interface for the mixins):

var _:any;
var __mixes_in = _.extend; // Lookup underscore.js' extend-metod. Simply copies properties from a to b

class asSettable {
    getx(key:string) { // renamed because of token-clash in asEventAndSettable
        return this[key];
    }
    setx(key:string, value) {
        this[key] = value;
        return this;
    }
}

class asEventable {
    _events: any;
    on(name:string, callback) {
        this._events = this._events || {};
        this._events[name] = callback;
    }
    trigger(name:string) {
        this._events[name].call(this);
  }
}

class asEventAndSettable {
   // Substitute these for real type definitions
   on:any;
   trigger:any;
   getx: any;
   setx: any;
}

class Model extends asEventAndSettable {
    /// ...
}

var m = __mixes_in(new Model(), asEventable, asSettable);

// m now has all methods mixed in.

As I commented on Steven's answer, mixins really should be a TypeScript feature.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd even say the first version should simply be how TypeScript implements mixins -- wouldn't be too hard. –  Sheeo Oct 4 '12 at 7:45
    
the problem with both of these options, if i'm understanding ts semantics correctly, is that they lose the 'functional' part of 'functional mixins'. you're only extending the class with the properties, and the thing that makes this style of mixins good is the fact that you can execute code along with the mixin, which gives you the chance to save little peices of state, or whatever you need to do. this sort of use of functions is IMO what makes JS worth anything at all (well... that and the whole web standards thing...) compared to other languages, but otherwise JS is just a weak replacement. –  aaronstacy Oct 4 '12 at 21:02
    
I believe you could use var mixed = _.extend(TestMixin.prototype, Mixin); to make life easier –  qbolec Sep 19 '13 at 17:09

One solution is to not use the typescript class system , but just the systeme of types and interfaces, in addition to the keyword 'new'.

    //the function that create class
function Class(construct : Function, proto : Object, ...mixins : Function[]) : Function {
        //...
        return function(){};
}

module Test { 

     //the type of A
    export interface IA {
        a(str1 : string) : void;
    }

    //the class A 
    //<new () => IA>  === cast to an anonyme function constructor that create an object of type IA, 
    // the signature of the constructor is placed here, but refactoring should not work
    //Class(<IA> { === cast an anonyme object with the signature of IA (for refactoring, but the rename IDE method not work )
    export var A = <new () => IA> Class(

        //the constructor with the same signature that the cast just above
        function() { } ,

        <IA> {
            //!! the IDE does not check that the object implement all members of the interface, but create an error if an membre is not in the interface
            a : function(str : string){}
        }
    );


    //the type of B
    export interface IB {
        b() : void;
    }
    //the implementation of IB
    export class B implements IB { 
        b() { }
    }

    //the type of C
    export interface IC extends IA, IB{
        c() : void;
        mystring: string;
    }

     //the implementation of IC
    export var C = <new (mystring : string) => IC> Class(

        //public key word not work
        function(mystring : string) { 

            //problem with 'this', doesn't reference an object of type IC, why??
            //but google compiler replace self by this !!
            var self = (<IC> this);
            self.mystring = mystring;
        } ,

        <IC> {

            c : function (){},

            //override a , and call the inherited method
            a: function (str: string) {

                (<IA> A.prototype).a.call(null, 5);//problem with call and apply, signature of call and apply are static, but should be dynamic

                //so, the 'Class' function must create an method for that
                (<IA> this.$super(A)).a('');
            }

        },
        //mixins
        A, B
    );

}

var c = new Test.C('');
c.a('');
c.b();
c.c();
c.d();//ok error !
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