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It took me awhile to figure out this error and was wondering why the second block of code doesn't work.

Working:

FILE *readFile;
FILE *saveFile;

char readFileName;
char saveFileName;

printf("read file name:\n");
scanf("%s", &readFileName);
readFile = fopen(&readFileName, "r");

printf("save file name:\n");
scanf("%s", &saveFileName);
saveFile = fopen(&saveFileName, "w");

Didn't work:

FILE *readFile;
FILE *saveFile;

char readFileName;
char saveFileName;

printf("read file name:\n");
scanf("%s", &readFileName);

printf("save file name:\n");
scanf("%s", &saveFileName);

readFile = fopen(&readFileName, "r");
saveFile = fopen(&saveFileName, "w");
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Where to begin... –  ta.speot.is Oct 4 '12 at 3:33
3  
Good luck not having undefined behaviour when trying to squeeze an elephant into a backpack of space. –  chris Oct 4 '12 at 3:33
    
readFileName and saveFileName are char, so they can hold only a single character. Use char arrays or pointers instead. –  Ilmo Euro Oct 4 '12 at 3:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are getting a reference to a single char allocated on a stack. That pointer is invalid to be used a reference to an array of character.

Try replacing your strings with a real array of character used as a buffer:

char readFileName[128];
scanf("%127s", readFileName);

otherwise what will happen is that scanf, that doens't check anything, will overwrite data on the stack with characters fetched from stdio, causing a stack buffer overflow, and this means undefined behavior.

You can specify how many characters to fetch at most in the format specifier, but remember to subtract one since a null terminator is automatically appended by scanf itself.

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otherwise what will happen is that scanf ... will overwrite data on the stack That problem exists here, too –  ta.speot.is Oct 4 '12 at 3:38
    
Yes, but a filename is not likely to be longer than 128 bytes. Problem is that scanf is just not safe enough :) In anycase I guess that adding a width specifier should fix the issue. –  Jack Oct 4 '12 at 3:39
1  
I think scanf("%127s", readFileName) would be safe (if I got the syntax correct). –  ta.speot.is Oct 4 '12 at 3:41
    
Yes, it should. Never happened to use it though. –  Jack Oct 4 '12 at 3:41
    
Thanks guys, that cleared everything up. –  user1455112 Oct 4 '12 at 3:50

It is by pure luck (undefined behavior) that one version of your program worked.

char readFileName;
...
scanf("%s", &readFileName);
readFile = fopen(&readFileName, "r");

You are writing an entire file name to a memory space of only one byte! Presumably you meant something like:

char readFileName[1024];
...
scanf("%s", readFileName);
readFile = fopen(readFileName, "r");

The "working" version of your program merely overwrote bytes that you don't immediately need to open the "save" file. That's why it appears to function correctly, even though it's wrong.

Be sure to allocate enough space before using scanf().

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