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I have a method (let's call it "CheckAll") that is called from multiple areas of my program, and can therefore be called for a 2nd time before the 1st time has completed.

To get around this I have implemented a "lock" that (if I understand it correctly), halts the 2nd thread until the 1st thread has completed.

However what I really want is for this 2nd call to return to the calling method immediately (rather than halt the thread), and to schedule CheckAll to be run again once it has completed the 1st time.

I could setup a timer to do this but that seems cumbersome and difficult. Is there a better way?

share|improve this question
    
Show the method. You might not need the lock at all. –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 4 '12 at 4:22
    
it's quite a long method involving a few database calls, so a bit difficult to post effectively, but it's logic is flawed if a second instance is writing to the same table at the same time. –  mcmillab Oct 4 '12 at 5:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Easy/cheap implementation.

private Thread checkThread = null;
private int requests = 0;

void CheckAll()
{
 lock(SyncRoot){
    if (checkThread != null; && checkThread.ThreadState == ThreadState.Running)
    {  
        requests++;
        return;
    }else
    {
        CheckAllImpl();
    }
 }

}

void CheckAppImpl()
{
 // start a new thread and run the following code in it.
  checkThread  = new Thread(newThreadStart( () => {
 while (true)
 {

 // 1. Do what ever checkall need to do.
 // 2.
     lock (SyncRoot)
     {
         requests--;
         if  (!(requests > 0))
            break;
     }
 }});
 checkThread.Start();
}

Just on a side note, this can have some race conditions. Better implementation swould be to use ConcurrentQueue introduced in .NET 4 which handles all the threading craziness for you.

UPDATE: Here's a more 'cool' implementation using ConcurrentQueue (turns out we don't need TPL.)

public class CheckAllService
{
    // Make sure you don't create multiple 
    // instances of this class. Make it a singleton.

    // Holds all the pending requests
    private ConcurrentQueue<object> requests = new ConcurrentQueue<object>();

    private object syncLock = new object();

    private Thread checkAllThread;

    /// <summary>
    /// Requests to Check All. This request is async, 
    /// and will be serviced when all pending requests 
    /// are serviced (if any).
    /// </summary>
    public void RequestCheckAll()
    {
        requests.Enqueue("Process this Scotty...");

        lock (syncLock)
        {   // Lock is to make sure we don't create multiple threads.
            if (checkAllThread == null || 
                checkAllThread.ThreadState != ThreadState.Running)
            {
                checkAllThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ListenAndProcessRequests));
                checkAllThread.Start();
            }
        }
    }

    private void ListenAndProcessRequests()
    {
        while (requests.Count != 0)
        {
            object thisRequestData;
            requests.TryDequeue(out thisRequestData);
            try
            {
                CheckAllImpl();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                // TODO: Log error ?
                // Can't afford to fail.
                // Failing the thread will cause all 
                // waiting requests to delay until another 
                // request come in.
            }
        }
    }

    protected void CheckAllImpl()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException("Check all is not gonna write it-self...");
        // TODO: Check All
    }
}

NOTE: I use a real Thread instead of a TPL Task because a Task doesn't hold on to a real thread as an optimization. When there's no Thread, that means at the time your application closes, any waiting CheckAll requests are ignored.(I got bitten hard by this when I thought I'm so smart to call my logging methods in a task once, which ignored a couple of dozen log records when closing. CLR checks and waits for any waiting threads when gracefully exiting.)

Happy Coding...

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but can you expand on how I would do the "start a new thread and run the following code in it" part? –  mcmillab Oct 4 '12 at 3:56
    
updated to have threading code. –  Madushan Oct 4 '12 at 4:00
    
is this using System.Threading? My Thread object doesn't have an IsRunning attribute, it does have one called IsAlive - is that the same? –  mcmillab Oct 4 '12 at 4:13
    
My bad... My head was thinking about Tasks.. Updated (again) .. You can use ThreadState == ThreadState.Running. –  Madushan Oct 4 '12 at 4:22
    
Also, consider using ConcurrentQueue as I mentioned for a cleaner and better implementation if you can use .NET 4 or above. –  Madushan Oct 4 '12 at 4:24

Use a separate thread to call CheckAll() in a loop that also waits on a semaphore. A 'PerformCheck()' method signals the semaphore.

Your system can then make as many calls to 'PerformCheck()' as it might wish, from any thread, and CheckAll() will be run exactly as many times as there are PerformCheck() calls, but with no blocking on PerformCheck().

No flags, no limits, no locking, no polling.

share|improve this answer
    
I've never heard of a semaphore, but a quick google of it looks very interesting, I will investigate. Thanks –  mcmillab Oct 4 '12 at 11:06
    
System.Threading.Semaphore –  Martin James Oct 4 '12 at 12:10

You can setup a flag for this.

When this CheckAll() method runs. at the end of this method you can put a flag for each of the separate method. means if the method is being called from other method lets say a() then immidiately after this it is going to be called from b() then>>> when it is called from a() put a flaga variable(which may be global) in CheckAll() at the end(assign it to particular value) and give the condition in b() according to the flaga variable value. Means something like this...

public a()
{
CheckAll();
} 

public b()
{
.
.
(put condition here for check when flaga=1 from the method CheckAll())
CheckAll();
}
public CheckAll()
{
.
.
.
flaga=1;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
here it seems that method b checks to see if CheckAll is being run from method a, presumably so that it can not call it if so. But would I not need to continually check for this in method B? What I'm really after is a set-and-forget method of saying "if CheckAll is currently being called, wait until it's finished and then call it again, but don't halt the current thread and don't rely on me to check again" –  mcmillab Oct 4 '12 at 4:01
    
means you want if checkall is currently running then no other should enter in it....for this it is more simpler than it. assign a single flag variable at the starting point of checkall()...and again asign it to other value at the end of checkall method. you have to simply add one condition at the start of each method comparing or checking the flag value and accordingly call the checkall() method –  Freelancer Oct 4 '12 at 4:07

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