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Pg. 29 of the Programming interviews exposed book has the following sample code to delete an element from a linked list:

bool deleteElement(IntElement **head, IntElement *deleteMe)
{

     IntElement *elem = *head;

     if(deleteMe == *head){ /*special case for head*/
         *head = elem->next;
         delete deleteMe;
         return true;
     }

     while (elem){
         if(elem->next == deleteMe){
             /*elem is element preceding deleteMe */
             elem->next = deleteMe->next;
             delete deleteMe;
             return true;
         }
         elem = elem->next;
     }

     /*deleteMe not found */
     return false;   
}

My question is about the statement "delete deleteMe", is this achieving the effect we want i.e. actually deleting the element at that position, or is it just deleting a copy of a pointer to the deleteMe element?

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1  
The line delete = deleteMe; appears to be a mistake; the = is erroneous. –  misha Oct 4 '12 at 4:09
1  
thanks for catching that –  user1487551 Oct 4 '12 at 4:14
1  
C++ mixed with C? What a book. –  texasbruce Oct 4 '12 at 4:33
    
Note that the calling function now has a dangling pointer to a deleted element in the list. This isn't a problem as long as it doesn't try to use it again. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 4 '12 at 4:40

3 Answers 3

Your question has already been answered, but I feel obliged to point out that if I were interviewing somebody, and they wrote the code this way, I wouldn't be terribly impressed.

For starters, the use of a pointer to a pointer here, while reasonable in C, is entirely unnecessary in C++. Instead, I'd prefer to see a reference to a pointer. Second, code that's const correct is generally preferable.

bool deleteElement(IntElement const *&head, IntElement const *deleteMe)
{
     IntElement *elem = head;

     if(deleteMe == head){ /*special case for head*/
         head = elem->next;
         delete deleteMe;
         return true;
     }    
     while (elem){
         if(elem->next == deleteMe){
             /*elem is element preceding deleteMe */
             elem->next = deleteMe->next;
             delete deleteMe;
             return true;
         }
         elem = elem->next;
     }    
     /*deleteMe not found */
     return false;   
}

Finally, I'd add one more special case in an attempt at avoiding an unnecessary traversal of the list. Unless the item to delete happens to be at the very end of the list, you can avoid the traversal. Let's assume your IntElement is something like:

struct IntElement { 
    int data;
    IntElement *next;
};

In this case:

bool simple_delete(IntElement *deleteMe) {
    IntElement *temp = deleteMe->next;
    deleteMe->data = temp->data;
    deleteMe->next = temp->next;
    delete temp;
    return true;
}

They're searching the whole list to find the previous element, so they can delete the element after it. Instead, we simply copy the next node into the current node, then delete the next node (note: in some cases it'll be better/faster to swap the data instead of copying). Also note that this can/will break things (quite thoroughly) if something else might be holding a pointer to the next node.

[For what it's worth, I originally learned this technique from Algorithms + Data Structures = Programs, by Niklaus Wirth, though I believe it originated with Knuth.]

Anyway, once we have that, we just add a bit of code to deleteElement to use that unless the node to be deleted happens to be the last in the list:

bool deleteElement(IntElement const *&head, IntElement *deleteMe) { 
    if (deleteMe->next != NULL)
        return simple_delete(deleteMe);
    // previous body of deleteElement
}

Where the original always had linear complexity, this has constant complexity in most cases. By using a list with a sentinel value instead of a NULL pointer at the end, you can ensure constant complexity in all cases (and simple_delete handles all cases -- you can eliminate the rest of the code entirely).

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delete deleteMe; calls the destructor on the element and frees its associated memory. This code is C++, btw.

The rest of the code alters the data structure, the list, to unlink the element from its neighbors.

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what would delete *deleteMe; do? –  user1487551 Oct 4 '12 at 4:20
4  
@user1487551: It wouldn't compile. The argument to delete must be a pointer to the object you wish to delete, and *deleteMe isn't a pointer. –  Marcelo Cantos Oct 4 '12 at 4:21
    
@user1487551 In lay-man terms, yes, it will delete *deleteMe. But in C++ terms it will delete deleteMe. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 4 '12 at 4:38
    
Peripherally related to this there is another function in the same book void removeHead(Node *head) { Nodetemp; delete *head; *head=temp; }. Now its not clear to me why *head can be addressed once its been deleted and also what would be the effect if you do delete head; instead of delete *head. –  user1487551 Oct 4 '12 at 7:48
    
head is a pointer to a pointer to a Node. By doing delete *head; you only delete a pointer to a Node and that Node disappears. But the pointer *head itself, which has been previously pointing to a Node, does not disappear, you can still assign something to it. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 4 '12 at 8:05

It's actually deleting the node itself and not the copy of it.

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