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I had a short interview where a question is like this: set an integer value to be 0xaa55 at address 0x*****9.

The only thing I noticed is that the address given is not aligned on word boundary. So setting an int *p to the address should not work. Then is it just using a unsigned char *p to assign the value byte-wise? Is it the point of this interview question? There is no point of doing this in real life, is there?

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1  
You can have anything stored at any offset provided that it's a valid location. Directly loading/storing a misaligned word will depend on whether the hardware supports it. –  Mysticial Oct 4 '12 at 6:01
    
Thanks Jonathan for the edit. I'll highlight keywords for my later posts. –  user1559625 Oct 4 '12 at 6:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need to get back to the interviewer with a number of subsidiary questions:

  1. What is the size in bytes of an int?
  2. Is the machine little-endian or big-endian?
  3. Does the machine handle non-aligned access automatically?
  4. What is the performance penalty for handling non-aligned access automatically?
  5. What is the point of this?

The chances are that someone is thinking of marshalling data the quick and dirty way.

You're right that one basic process is to write the bytes via a char * or unsigned char * that is initialized to the relevant address. The answers to my subsidiary questions 1 and 2 determine the exact mechanism to use, but for a 2-byte int in little-endian format, you might use:

unsigned char *p = 0x*****9; // Copied from question!
unsigned int v = 0xAA55;

*p++ = v & 0xFF;
v >>= 8;
*p   = v & 0xFF;

You can generalize to 4-byte or 8-byte integers easily; handling big-endian integers is a bit more fiddly.


I assembled some timing code to see what the relative costs were. Tested on a MacBook Pro (2.3 GHz Intel Core i7, 16 GiB 1333 MHz DDR3 RAM, Mac OS X 10.7.5, home-built GCC 4.7.1), I got the following times for the non-optimized code:

Aligned:          0.238420
Marshalled:       0.931727
Unaligned:        0.243081
Memcopy:          1.047383
Aligned:          0.239070
Marshalled:       0.931718
Unaligned:        0.242505
Memcopy:          1.060336
Aligned:          0.239915
Marshalled:       0.934913
Unaligned:        0.242374
Memcopy:          1.049218

When compiled with optimization, I got segmentation faults, even without -DUSE_UNALIGNED — which puzzles me a bit. Debugging was not easy; there seemed to be a lot of aggressive inline optimization which meant that variables could not be printed by the debugger.

The code is below. The Clock type and the time.h header (and timer.c source) are not shown, but can be provided on request (see my profile). They provide high resolution timing across most platforms (Windows is shakiest).

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "timer.h"

static int array[100000];
enum { ARRAY_SIZE = sizeof(array) / sizeof(array[0]) };
static int repcount = 1000;

static void uac_aligned(int value)
{
    int *base = array;
    for (int i = 0; i < repcount; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < ARRAY_SIZE - 2; j++)
            base[j] = value;
    }
}

static void uac_marshalled(int value)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < repcount; i++)
    {
        char *base = (char *)array + 1;
        for (int j = 0; j < ARRAY_SIZE - 2; j++)
        {
            *base++ = value & 0xFF;
            value >>= 8;
            *base++ = value & 0xFF;
            value >>= 8;
            *base++ = value & 0xFF;
            value >>= 8;
            *base   = value & 0xFF;
            value >>= 8;
        }
    }
}

#ifdef USE_UNALIGNED
static void uac_unaligned(int value)
{
    int *base = (int *)((char *)array + 1);
    for (int i = 0; i < repcount; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < ARRAY_SIZE - 2; j++)
            base[j] = value;
    }
}
#endif /* USE_UNALIGNED */

static void uac_memcpy(int value)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < repcount; i++)
    {
        char *base = (char *)array + 1;
        for (int j = 0; j < ARRAY_SIZE - 2; j++)
        {
            memcpy(base, &value, sizeof(int));
            base += sizeof(int);
        }
    }
}

static void time_it(int value, const char *tag, void (*function)(int value))
{
    Clock c;
    char buffer[32];
    clk_init(&c);
    clk_start(&c);
    (*function)(value);
    clk_stop(&c);
    printf("%-12s  %12s\n", tag, clk_elapsed_us(&c, buffer, sizeof(buffer)));
}

int main(void)
{
    int value = 0xAA55;

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        time_it(value, "Aligned:",   uac_aligned);
        time_it(value, "Marshalled:", uac_marshalled);
#ifdef USE_UNALIGNED
        time_it(value, "Unaligned:", uac_unaligned);
#endif /* USE_UNALIGNED */
        time_it(value, "Memcopy:",   uac_memcpy);
    }
    return(0);
}
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Why not simply use int* p = (int*) 0x456789; *p = 0xaa55;? The interview question did not mention endianess, it simply asked to store an integer at the given address. Depending on the architecture, this might be 0xaa 0x55 or 0x55 0xaa, but it is still an integer (additional 0x00 for 32 bit integer discarded) –  Andreas Oct 4 '12 at 6:19
1  
No, it's undefined behavior. –  R.. Oct 4 '12 at 6:21
2  
On many (most?) types of machine, a non-aligned access like that is either the cause of a bus error (SIGBUS plus core dump) or an extremely expensive fault which traps to the o/s, fixes the problem by doing aligned accesses, and returns. Intel machines are more tolerant; they do a double read, sort out the mess, and then do a double write, but it is still not good for performance. That's why the answers to the questions I raised are important. It may be that your suggestion is adequate, but there's not an awful lot of challenge in the question if so! The goal is to see if you know the issues. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 4 '12 at 6:23
    
@JonathanLeffler Right - been too focused on x86 ;) It seems that many recent architectures also support unaligned accesses (have not checked whether the CPU itself or the compiler "sorts out the mess"), just tried on a recent SPARC and RS6000 system and it works there. But still, it is certainly undefined behaviour ... –  Andreas Oct 4 '12 at 6:42
    
IIRC, on (early versions of) the DEC Alpha, there was a command uac (unaligned access control), and an unaligned access generated a printed warning (unless you used uac to turn that off), and it also involved a trap into the O/S and so on (which is why the warning was apposite). RISC was generally less tolerant; it would be interesting to time code doing aligned assignment vs non-aligned assignment on the different machines to see how bad the performance penalty is. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 4 '12 at 6:46

Yes, you may need to deal with unaligned multi-byte values in real life. Imagine your device exchanges data with another device. For example, this data may be a message structure sent over a network or a file structure saved to disk. The format of that data may be predefined and not under your control. And the definiton of the data structure may not account for alignement (or even endianness) restrictions of your device. In these situations you'll need to take care when accessing these unaligned multi-byte values.

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memcpy((void *)0x23456789, &(int){0xaa55}, sizeof(int));
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That's simple if the assumptions you make when doing it are the ones you're supposed to make, but the result depends on the endianess of the machine. This may not matter at all; indeed, it is quite likely to be fine (to the extent that there's any point in the exercise at all). –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 4 '12 at 6:29
    
The first argument to memcpy() is of type void*. 0x23456789 doesn't match (and isn't converted implicitly). Using (void*)0x23456789 should fix that. Assuming that memcpy() is available; it's not required for "freestanding implementations". –  Keith Thompson Oct 4 '12 at 6:43
    
Sorry, fixed. Must have been in a hurry. As for freestanding implementations lacking memcpy, it's trivial to write void *memcpy(void*d1,void*s1,size_t n) { unsigned char *d=d1,*s=s1; while(n--) *d++=*s++; return d1; } –  R.. Oct 4 '12 at 12:15

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