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I am trying to take 3 numbers and print them from least to greatest. The body of my current while{} and the second body of while{} (at bottom) work while they are in main(), but my current body of while{} does not work.. even though the second body of while{} (at bottom) works.

Basically I have to while{} bodies. They both work when in function main(). Only one works when in its own function (the second one at the very bottom) and I need the one that is shown in the full code to work. Any ideas??? Thanks so much for help!

By not working I mean the console just waits after the 3 ints are typed.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void sortThree(int *a, int *b, int *c);

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int a, b, c, hold;

        printf("Please input three numbers\n"
               "with a space between each and then press enter:  ");
        scanf("%lf %lf %lf", &a, &b, &c);

        sortThree( &a, &b, &c);

        printf("\n\n%lf %lf %lf", a, b, c);

    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}


void sortThree(int *a, int *b, int *c)
{

    while ((*a>*b)||(*b>*c)||(*a>*c))
    {
         if (*a>*b)
           *b = (*a += *b -= *a) - *b;

         if (*b>*c)
           *b = (*c += *b -= *c) - *b;

         if (*a>*c)
           *c = (*a += *c -= *a) - *c;
    }
}

This is the second while{} body. It works while in main() and while in its own function.

   if (*a>*b)
        {
            int hold;
        hold= *a;
        *a = *b;
        *b = hold;
    }

    if (*b>*c)
    {
        int hold;
        hold= *b;
        *b = *c;
        *c = hold;
    }

    if (*a>*c)
    {
        int hold;
        hold= *a;
        *a = *c;
        *c = hold;
    }
share|improve this question
1  
Does writing *b = (*a += *b -= *a) - *b make any sense apart from being complicated? –  JohnB Oct 4 '12 at 6:10
1  
A line such as *b = (*a += *b -= *a) - *b; basically boils down to something like int i = 0; i = (i += 1) + i;, which GCC duly reports as warning: operation on 'i' may be undefined [-Wsequence-point]. –  chris Oct 4 '12 at 6:12
1  
It is a shorter way to say tempHold = *a; *a = *b; *b = tempHold; –  nonyeah Oct 4 '12 at 6:22
3  
I would stick with the second implementation. It is simpler and easier to understand. And it works! –  tranceporter Oct 4 '12 at 6:44
1  
@nonyeah If you don't choose a ridiculously long variable name for the temp, yours is not shorter, and the canonical way with a temp variable a) doesn't invoke UB, b) works generally, even when the two pointers point to the same location, and c) lets the compiler generate the optimal code for your platform, since it recognises the swap. All in all, except for impressing naive beginners, the canonical way is far superior in every way. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 4 '12 at 14:31

3 Answers 3

The first one is not working because of wrong syntax. You should use

If (*a > *c)

Instead of

If (a > c)
share|improve this answer
    
The syntex has been corrected, yet it still only gives the lowest value and 0s for the middle (b) and greatest (c) –  nonyeah Oct 4 '12 at 6:27
    
Yes, that was a definite problem. Thanks! –  nonyeah Oct 4 '12 at 6:50

The first doesn't work because you can't rely on left-to-right evaluation order. The expression

*b = (*a += *b -= *a) - *b;

is a problem because you're trying to change the value of a variable twice with no in-between sequence point. You can't do that - it's undefined behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. In that case I'm not entirely sure why it worked, but it did. –  nonyeah Oct 4 '12 at 6:49
    
@nonyeah: Glad you've sorted it out, but be careful, as I understand it, you're in dangerous territory with that kind of syntax - another compiler may do things differently. –  acraig5075 Oct 4 '12 at 6:53
    
@nonyeah I can i.e. write a program that uses two variables that usually end up as [var A][var B] in memory and use pointer to var A to read var A + 1 to get var B. It might work nice for 1 year until a change is made and everything goes to pieces and I have a bug that would be a nightmare to track. That things "work" does not mean it is correct. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ariane_5_Flight_501 –  Morpfh Oct 4 '12 at 7:07

Oddly enough it was not the function that was the problem it was scan and printing as a double instead of an int.

scanf("%i %i %i", &a, &b, &c);
sortThree( &a, &b, &c);
printf("\n\n%i %i %i", a, b, c);

There is no problem (at least in Code::Blocks) with this. As far as I can tell it works great!

*b = (*a += *b -= *a) - *b;    
share|improve this answer
2  
That things "work" is not a good thing when it is undefined behavior. You'll never know when it won't work. You cant rely on the result. A different system might produce a completely different result etc. (If gcc; use -Wall -Wextra -pedantic and take heed to every warning and notification.) –  Morpfh Oct 4 '12 at 6:52

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