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This must be quite naive but I have a doubt on when to use @Entity and @Embeddable

Say I have a User and Notification class.

 @Entity
 public class User{
 //other properties
 @onetomany
 private List<Notification> notifications;
 }

 @Entity
 public class Notification{
 //properties
 }

I understand that there will be tables for class User and Notification, and a third table for mapping. What if I do it like this?

 @Entity
 public class User {
 //other properties
 @ElementCollection
 private List<Notification> notifications;
 }

 @Embeddable
 public class Notification{
 //properties
 }

I know this won't create a table for Notification. But I can still store my notification objects. I went through the documentation, But couple of doubts

  1. Is it based on whether I want to see class B as a seperate table?
  2. Is there a performance difference b/w creating a table and an embeddable object?
  3. What can I not do with embeddable object that I can do with a table other than directly querying the table?

NOTES

For anyone reading this question, this question too might help you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

1.  Is it based on whether I want to see class B as a seperate table?

   yes, When you use `@Embedded`, You embed that `@Embeddable` entity in `@Entity` class, which makes it to add columns for embedded entity in same table of `@Entity` class.

2.  Is there a performance difference b/w creating a table and an embeddable object?

   When you use `@Embedded`, for table creation, one query is required, also for inserting and selecting a row. But if you don't use it, multiple queries are required, hence, use of `@Embedded` yields more performance, we can say.

3.  What can I not do with embeddable object that I can do with a table other than directly querying the table?

   Removing the respective embedded entity may be, but there may be integrity constraint violations for this.

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I suppose I can use Embeddable with ElementCollection. I need not use @Embedded rt? –  shazinltc Oct 4 '12 at 7:48
    
I didn't get your third point. –  shazinltc Oct 4 '12 at 7:49
    
3rd point: consider Person contains Address (embedded), if there is separate table for both, You can directly remove associated address, but if Person's table has F.K. to address, it may cause integrity constraint violation. –  deepakraut Oct 4 '12 at 8:32
    
'@Embeddable' makes the class eligible for embedding. '@Embedded' actually embeds the embeddable entity. –  deepakraut Oct 4 '12 at 8:35
    
en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Java_Persistence/Embeddables this gives nice explanation for embeddable and embedded –  deepakraut Oct 4 '12 at 8:37

In JPA, there’s a couple ways to create composite key fields. Lets see the method using the @Embeddable annotation.
Let’s start with the Entity class.

@Entity
@Table
public class TraceRecord {
    @Id
    private TraceRecordPk id;

    @Version
    @Transient
    private int version;

    @Column(columnDefinition = "char")
    private String durationOfCall;

    @Column(columnDefinition = "char")
    private String digitsDialed;

    @Column(columnDefinition = "char")
    private String prefixCalled;

    @Column(columnDefinition = "char")
    private String areaCodeCalled;

    @Column(columnDefinition = "char")
    private String numberCalled;
}

This is a pretty simple Entity class with an @Id and @Version field and a few @Column definitions. Without going into too much detail, you’ll see that the @Version field is also annotated @Transient. I’ve done this simply because my table also doesn’t have a column for tracking versions, but my database is journaled, so I’m not too concerned about versioning. You’ll also notice that the @Column fields have a value of “char” set on the columnDefinition attribute. This is because the fields in my table are defined as char and not varchar. If they were varchar, I wouldn’t need to do this since a String maps to a varchar field by default.

The @Id field is what I’m interested in right now. It’s not a standard Java type, but a class I’ve defined myself. Here is that class.

@Embeddable
public class TraceRecordPk implements Serializable {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    @Temporal(TemporalType.DATE)
    @Column
    private Date dateOfCall;

    @Column(columnDefinition="char")
    private String timeOfCall;

    @Column(columnDefinition="char")
    private String callingParty;

    /**
     * Constructor that takes values for all 3 members.
     *
     * @param dateOfCall Date the call was made
     * @param timeOfCall Time the call was made
     * @param callingParty Extension from which the call originated
     */
    public TraceRecordPk(Date dateOfCall, String timeOfCall, String callingParty) {
        this.dateOfCall = dateOfCall;
        this.timeOfCall = timeOfCall;
        this.callingParty = callingParty;
    }
}

To make this class capable of being an @Id field on an Entity class, it needs to be annotated with @Embeddable like I mentioned earlier. The 3 fields I’ve selected for my composite key are just normal @Column definitions. Rather than create getters/setters for each field, I’ve simply implemented a constructor that takes values for all 3 fields, making any instance immutable. When annotating a class with @Embeddable, that class will need to implement Serializable. So I’ve added a default serialVersionUID to accomodate.

Now that you have a class created and annotated with @Embeddable, you can now use it as the type for an @Id field in your Entity class. Simple stuff eh.

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Thanks but I have read this article. It doesn't answer my question. My question isn't anyway related to composite keys. –  shazinltc Oct 4 '12 at 6:55

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