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      1 #include <stdio.h>
      2 
      3 
      4 struct test {
      5     char c;
      6     int i;
      7     double d;
      8     void *p;
      9     int a[0];
     10 };  
     11     
     12 int main (void) {
     13     struct test t;
     14     printf("size of struct is: %d\n", sizeof(t));
     15     return 0;
     16 }

Output:

size of struct is: 20

Why int a[0] is not considered?

I tried:

  1 #include <stdio.h>
  2 
  3 
  4 struct test {
  5     int a[0];
  6 };  
  7     
  8 int main (void) {
  9     struct test t;
 10     printf("size of struct is: %d\n", sizeof(t));
 11     return 0;
 12 }

And output:

size of struct is: 0

a[0] is a member of structure. Then how come it is not considered in the size of structure?

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2  
which size do you expect int a[0] to have? –  glglgl Oct 4 '12 at 6:52
    
Just a wild guess - a[0] is array with zero elements, sounds logical its size to be zero. –  tsv.dimitrov Oct 4 '12 at 6:52
    
int a[0] stores zero integers in memory. –  Nocturno Oct 4 '12 at 6:53
    
i was thinking since it is a pointer to int, it may take 4B space. But yeah, as arr size is 0, may be answer is 0. –  Ram Oct 4 '12 at 6:55
    
I really dont know how to accept an answer and close thread. will try –  Ram Oct 4 '12 at 6:57

3 Answers 3

This is actually more complicated that it may look in the first place.

First of all, a member int a[0] is a constraint violation ("syntax error") in standard C. You must encounter an extension that is provided by your compiler.

Arrays of zero size had often be used by pre-C99 compilers to emulate the effect of flexible array members, that have the syntax int a[] without bounds as the last member of a struct.

For the size of the whole struct, such an array doesn't count by itself, but it may impose alignment constraints. In particular, it might add padding to the end of the other part of the structure. If you'd do the same test for

struct toto {
   char name[3];
   double a[];
};

(with [0] if your compiler needs it), you most probable see a size of 4 or 8 for it, since these are the usually alignment requirements for double.

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Now try this:

 1 #include <stdio.h>
  2 
  3 
  4 struct test {
  5     int a[0];
  6 };  
  7     
  8 int main (void) {
  9     struct test t;
 10     printf("size of struct is: %d\n", sizeof(t)==sizeof(t.a));
 11     return 0;
 12 }

If you have no money in your bank account you don't have money at all :)

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The size of a array with zero element is 0.you can check with sizeof(a[0]).so it is not consider in the size of the structure.

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