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I am writing a simple dictionary attack in python for class. We are provided with a shadow file that contains the username and hashed password and a dictionary file. We need to add a salt of 1-255, prepended to each dictionary word and then get the MD5 hash of each to compare to the shadow file. I'm very close, but my problem is the encoding I believe. My instructor said the salt+password are stored as an unsigned char array in C before hashing. How do I convert to this in python? I've tried several encodings including ISO-8859-1 and nothing seems to work. I can provide my code if necessary.

Here is my code:

import hashlib

print("Generating Hashes...")
hash_table = {}

def crack(Hash=None):
    if Hash in hash_table:
        print "MATCH\n",hash_table[Hash]
    else:
        print  "NO MATCH"


with open('dictionary','r') as inp_file:
    for word in inp_file.readlines():
        word = word.strip()
        for salt in range(0,256):
            salt = str(salt)
            final = salt+word
            #print final
            final = final.encode('iso-8859-1')
            hash_table[hashlib.md5(final).hexdigest()] = salt+word
#print hash_table

with open('shadow3','r') as inp_file2:
    for line in inp_file2.readlines():
        line = line.strip()
        line1 = line.split(":")[1:]
        print line1[0]
        crack(line1[0])

here is the provided shadow file

tleela:72fd3dbc120ea01dd9e7c68d6f257181
hfarnsworth:204b319de6f41bbfdbcb28da724dda23
jzoidberg:a08a9e38a28e64583700b20a8251c2ba
brodrgue:eac6bf62c93cbe3f9f934b5143d945e4
pfry:e262e88b10ea1bcdbb385e74216d3a7a
awong:fe58b4b4cecd58d47b08b1916fae00ac
hconrad:4cdbade3215a250eb5607a1127b8f755

and here is the result I am currently getting. only one password is found:

Desktop/pyhton1# python hash1.py 
Generating Hashes...
72fd3dbc120ea01dd9e7c68d6f257181
NO MATCH
204b319de6f41bbfdbcb28da724dda23
NO MATCH
a08a9e38a28e64583700b20a8251c2ba
NO MATCH
eac6bf62c93cbe3f9f934b5143d945e4
NO MATCH
e262e88b10ea1bcdbb385e74216d3a7a
MATCH
6expression
fe58b4b4cecd58d47b08b1916fae00ac
NO MATCH
4cdbade3215a250eb5607a1127b8f755
NO MATCH
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Is it possible that only one of the passwords can be bruteforced this way? –  John La Rooy Oct 5 '12 at 5:09

2 Answers 2

>>> bytearray("foobar")
bytearray(b'foobar')

>>> for c in bytearray("foobar"):
...     print c
... 
102
111
111
98
97
114

I'm not sure that this really solves your hashing problem though as the md5 library works fine with strings. Maybe you can show your code and why you think it is wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Does not work here without the encoding argument. According to docu of 2.7 and 3.3: If it is a string, you must also give the encoding (and optionally, errors) parameters; –  halex Oct 4 '12 at 7:48
    
why not just map(ord,"foobar")? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 4 '12 at 7:51
    
@halex, the docs are confusing. They are taking about "string" to mean a unicode object. Passing a str in 2.x is the same as passing bytes in 3.x, so no encoding would be required. –  John La Rooy Oct 5 '12 at 5:02

From your description, I guess that your main problem is how to add the salt value to the dictionary string. Assuming you use python2, this can be done as follows: char(salt_byte) + dictionary_string.

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