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I couldn't find an answer to my problem so I post it as a question. I make a small dummy example to explain it:

enum STORAGE_TYPE
{
    CONTIGUOUS,
    NON_CONTIGUOUS
};

template <typename T, STORAGE_TYPE type=CONTIGUOUS>
class Data
{
    public:
        void a() { return 1; }
};

// partial type specialization
template <typename T>
class Data<T, NON_CONTIGUOUS>
{
    public:
        void b() { return 0; }
};

// this method should accept any Data including specializations…
template <typename T, STORAGE_TYPE type>
void func(Data<T, type> &d)
{
    /* How could I determine statically the STORAGE_TYPE? */
    #if .. ?? 
        d.a();
    #else
        d.b();
    #endif      
}


int main()
{
    Data<int> d1;
    Data<int, NON_CONTIGUOUS> d2;

    func(d1);
    func(d2);

    return 0;
}

Please note that (1) I do not want a specialization of "func", as that could solve it but I just want to have 1 generic method "func" with internal static "if" conditions to execute the code. (2) and I would prefer solution with standard C++ (not C++0x or boost).

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1  
C++0x (today C++11) is the current standard. –  Ubiquité Oct 4 '12 at 7:56
    
I think func specialization would be the best solution (easiest to read), but as your template parameter named type is a value and not a type, can't you just use type as a rvalue inside a if test ? –  Ubiquité Oct 4 '12 at 8:00
    
The obvious solution is to give the same name to member functions that are called through (static) polymorphism. –  Nicola Musatti Oct 4 '12 at 8:06
    
@Ubiquité The real problem is that without specialization or overloading there will always be an invalid call to either a() or b() –  Nicola Musatti Oct 4 '12 at 8:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use traits technique ( http://www.boost.org/community/generic_programming.html#traits ):

template <typename T, STORAGE_TYPE type>
struct DataTraits {
  static void callFunction(Data<T, type> &d)
  {
    d.a();
  }
};

template <typename T>
struct DataTraits<T,NON_CONTIGUOUS> {
  static void callFunction(Data<T, NON_CONTIGUOUS> &d)
  {
    d.b();
  }
};


// this method should accept any Data including specializations…
template <typename T, STORAGE_TYPE type>
void func(Data<T, type> &d)
{
    /* How could I determine statically the STORAGE_TYPE? */
    DataTraits<T,type>::callFunction(d);
}
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Thanks but I have dozens of methods (some overlapping, some completely different) in "Data" so couldn't wrap every possibility. I was thinking about "typedef" usage but don't know how to make it work actually. –  user600029 Oct 4 '12 at 8:03
    
You can put in DataTraits whatever you wants, even dozens of method. With tag dispatching - traits are used in std C++ library - and it seems they cover all the differences between very different types. Add some example to your question of completely different elements in Data, maybe I could help. –  PiotrNycz Oct 4 '12 at 8:07

The key is SFinae. You have to declare a helper class templated on storage type and provide a definitionodefinitional for one of the two. This way if the specialization exists you know at compile time which storage type you have (the one that you provided a definiton for) and if the substitution fails (which is not an error, SFINAE) you are in the other case.

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